From the yearly archives: "2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pink Bug
Location: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro
December 23, 2010 9:13 am
Hi!!! I took these pics months ago, but i have no idea of what bug this could be!!! I’m thinking it might be a pink katydid but i’m not sure at all!! I’m sorry for the quality of the images!!!
Signature: Mac

Unknown Katydid

Dear Mac,
This is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, and there is a really good chance that it is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae.  We will try to get a definitive identification from Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki.  Many typically green Katydids have pink or brown morphs and this particular specimen blending in so nicely with the pink blossom might explain how this unusual coloration may contribute to the survival of certain individuals.

Unknown Katydid

Piotr Naskrecki responds
February 9, 2011
Hi Daniel,
… The pink Brazilian katydid is a young nymph of a phaneropterine katydid, but it is too young to be identified based on the photos.
Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Here is a picture of a huge bug in Costa Rica
Location: Costa Rica
December 25, 2010 11:45 am
Any idea what it is?
Signature: BUG MAN

Giant Grasshopper

In its native habitat of Central and South America, this Giant Grasshopper, Tropidacris dux, is commonly called a Giant Brown Cricket though it is really a Grasshopper.  It is frequently mistaken for a bird in flight.  We can’t help but wonder how old this image is since it is a scanned medium format photographic image as opposed to a digitally captured original.

Thank you. This was actually taken very recently. I believe with an iPhone. A filter or digital treatment may have been applied. Thank you for your help!

Thanks for the clarification on the original photographic file.  We are intrigued with the way that traditional photography is mimicked, or better, counterfeited, through the use of special post production applications.  We first became aware of this fetishization of the image with post production in videos that allow for adding dust and scratches to capture the feel of nostalgic film since video does not scratch or contain dust.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

small scorpion looking bug
Location: wisconsin usa
December 25, 2010 9:58 pm
found this bug on the wall in my infant childs room. is there any danger? thanks
Signature: josh kwiatkowski

Pseudoscorpion

Hi Josh,
The harmless Pseudoscorpion if often found in the home where it will prey upon small insects and other arthropods.  Since the Pseudoscorpion lacks venom, it is perfectly harmless and you have no cause for alarm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

AZ ant
Location: Tortilla Creek, Superstition Mtns, AZ
December 26, 2010 1:06 am
I photographed this ant on 12-25-2010 in the Superstition Mtns (~2,500’). I could not identify it in the Kaufman insect guide, so I bow in your general direction if you can make an identification.
Signature: Pat Livecchi

Major Worker Carpenter Ant

Hi Pat,
Your ant looks very much like several images of Carpenter Ants posted to BugGuide, including this image of
Camponotus nearcticus from Texas, however, we are reluctant to try to provide an actual species or even subgenus identification.  According to BugGuide, Ants in the genus Camponotus “are often called ‘carpenter ants’ because many species nest in dry or moist rotten wood, and some may nest in wooden houses, sheds, etc. However, in the East, C. americanus and C. castaneus nest in soil, and in the West, perhaps the majority of species (but usually not those in the subgenera Camponotus and Myrmentoma) nest in soil.”  These large headed individuals belong to the caste of major workers according to a comment posted on BugGuide.  The University of Missouri Extension website has a nice diagram of the various castes of Carpenter Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bed bug?
Location: Cincinnati, OH
December 20, 2010 11:52 pm
Hi BugMan,
I’m sort of freaking out here. My boyfriend went to crawl into bed and found this crawling under the pillow. He swears to me it’s a bedbug but I guess I just don’t want to believe it. This is the only one I’ve found ever, and I just throughly cleaned our bedroom and house yesterday. We tore the mattress and sheets apart and searched under the bed with a flashlight (the cover under the box spring is still on the bed) no signs of feces or blood spots, eggs or other bugs. We searched the base boards, and all the cracks and crevices by our bed and have come up with nothing. We have also never had any bites or anything that looks like a bite or itchiness. We have 2 dogs and maybe one of them brought something in tonight? But I want to know definitely if this is a bedbug. It’s not quite as fat as some I’ve seen online and it seems fairly big for a bed bug probably the size of a dime or so… and flat like a bedbug.
Please help. I won’t sleep tonight, but I just wanna know. 🙁
Thanks!
Signature: Stephanie

Possibly a Bed Bug

Dear Stephanie,
Most of the images we receive of suspected Bed Bugs are actually Carpet Beetle Larvae, Stink Bugs or Pantry Beetles, and your image is far to blurry to make a conclusive identification, however, this creature does actually resemble a Bed Bug.  Keep vigilant and continue to search for possible Bed Bugs until you are certain that you do not have any of the nocturnal, blood sucking creatures that have been getting so much media attention in recent years.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS BUG
Location: Lat/Lon: 27.6° S 48.6° W
December 25, 2010 8:02 am
I COULD NOT IDENTIFY THIS BUG.
FOUND AT HOME, SPRING 2010, CITY: FLORIANOPOLIS, STATE: SANTA CATARINA, BRAZIL.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MOURA
Signature: ANDRÉ LEAL

Harlequin Beetle

Dear André,
This magnificent beetle is known as the Harlequin Beetle,
Acrocinus longimanus, and it ranges from Mexico to South America and is also found on the islands in the Caribbean.  Encyclopedia Britannica Online has some interesting information on this species.

Harlequin Beetle

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your answer. On Xmas day!!!!!
Congratulations for your wonderful website.
Have you ever heard about Fritz Muller? He was a extraordinary researcher during the 19th century , who lived about 80 miles from my hometown. An early Darwin’s theories supporter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritz_M%C3%BCller
Thanks very much and happy new year.
Regards
André Leal

Harlequin Beetle

Hi again André,
Thanks for your kind compliments.  Though we were aware of Mullerian Mimicry, we were not aware of the details of the research of Fritz Muller that resulted in the term.  Thanks for the link.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination