What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bark Scorpion vs Dog
Location: Las Vegas, NV
December 22, 2010 12:29 pm
I just wanted to let you know that, between a legitimate (confirmed ID done by the local Dept. of Agriculture) bark scorpion infestation and your site, our home has become more & more bug & arachnid friendly each year.
We have bark scorpions in our home & yard, which *are* dangerous – especially to my husband because he has proven allergic to their venom. However, we noticed that once we gave up trying to exterminate them chemically (they’ve proven almost indestructible to everything except blunt force trauma) they stopped investigating the house as much & seemed more content to stay in the back yard. We came to the determination that since we no longer spray, their food sources – crickets & roaches – are abundant outside. Since the scorpions stay outside, our yard is relatively pest-free and our home is completely pest-free. Along with the active hunters, we have two walls full of big, gnarly, oft-mistaken-for-recluses brown house spiders, and occasional batches of tiny, beautiful brown widows (they’re pale with dark brown leg joints & hourglasses) along the base of the house, and we’ve been visited by regular ol’ centipedes *and* house centipedes.
However, my husband has been getting more & more concerned because we have a nosy dog – meaning she investigates *everything* nose first. Just how dangerous would a bark scorpion sting be to her if it hit her in the face? I’m not too worried about the brown widows – they run & hide – but the scorpions are bold and aggressive, especially in summer.
Signature: Jane from Las Vegas

Bark Scorpion

Dear Jane,
We are happy that you have learned to respect and cohabitate with some of the venomous species in your area and also that you have come to the realization that total annihilation of potentially harmful species is not really practical outside of a closed system.  Here is what BugGuide has to say about the sting of the Arizona Bark Scorpion:  “The sting of one of our scorpions, however, Centruroides sculpturatus(until recently thought to be the same as Centruroides exilicauda), the Arizona Bark Scorpion, can be fatal. Most healthy adults are not at significant risk- only children, with their smaller body size, are in danger (treatment with antivenom has pretty much put a stop to deaths where available, but bark-scorpion stings should still be taken very seriously). The site of the sting does not become discolored.
”  Probably your best source for information on the danger to your dog would be a local veterinarian.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Nevada

2 Responses to Bark Scorpion

  1. kiyotesong says:

    I submitted this to y’all because our vet doesn’t seem to know what the reactions might be, and there isn’t that much data on the internet on dogs being stung by scorpions. Maybe another Constant Reader can offer me some feedback?

    I know when my husband was stung (he was moving bricks. In the yard. With no gloves on. Yeah, awesome decision!) the scorpion was big enough that the stinger didn’t just puncture his finger, it slashed it open like a small, sharp knife. My husband said it felt like someone jammed a hot, sharp iron poker into his hand up into his skull. His hand immediately began to swell, followed by his arm, up to his elbow. I was at work when it happened, but when we were reunited after his trip to the ER about 5 hours later, his arm looked like Popeye’s, it was *that* bad. He had an anaphylactic reaction to the sting, so by the time he got to the ER, his throat & tongue were swollen & he couldn’t talk. The triage nurse, ER doc & everyone who happened to stroll by lectured him on the dangers of driving himself to the ER and he couldn’t verbally defend himself.

    The ER people didn’t want to give him the antivenin because of his allergic reaction, so all they could do was support treatment – lots and lots of fluids, antihistamines and pain killers. Moral of the story? Wear gloves and shoes when doing yardwork, especially if you know you live in an area with potentially dangerous wildlife. We also shake out all bedding, clothing, and tend to move things on high shelves with the broomstick first.

    • bugman says:

      We are sure you must also know that checking your shoes before slipping your feet inside is mandatory Scorpion territory protocol.

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