From the monthly archives: "November 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Identify bettle
Location: Thailand
November 2, 2010 1:04 am
Please assist to identify this bettle
Signature: sulasno

Mango Stem Borer

Hi sulasno,
Your beetle is Batocera rufomaculata, and it is commonly called a Mango Stem Borer.  It is one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles or Longicorns in the family Cerambycidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

November 1, 2010
Greetings;
Since I wrote in to ask what kind of buy I happened upon, I posted his pic on Facebook and one friend said it looked like a potato bug.  When I searched for other pictures of “Potato Bug”, most of them looked just like the little critter I found.
I’ve attached the picture here in case there’s no way to trace this email to my original post.
If you can post more information about the Potato Bug, I’d be interested to read what you came up with.
Jessica Good

Potato Bug

Our Automated Response
On Wed, Oct 20, 2010 at 2:11 PM
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Greetings;
We recently moved to Cedar Mesa on Colorado’s Western Slope.  It’s mid-October, so the days start out cool, warm up for a bit, and the night time temps are about in the upper 30’s to 40’s.
At the beginning of our late-morning stoll on the property, I found what appears to be a mixed-breed insect heading towards a cedar tree from under the back deck.
It’s about 1.5″ – 2″ long, and has a head like a very giant ant or grasshopper, its 6 legs are similar to bean sprouts but look like beetle legs, and its abdomen looks like that of a wasp.  It does not appear to have been injured or mutilated (missing wings, etc.).
Would you happen to have seen one of these before or know what it is?

November 2, 2010
Hi Jessica,
We are sorry we did not respond to your original letter.  As our automated response indicates, we are unable to respond to all of the mail that we receive.  Now that you know that this is a Potato Bug, you can use our search engine to find letters from our archive, or you can scroll down the list of categories on the home page until you reach Potato Bugs to see all the letters we have compiled in that location.  You can also find Potato Bugs in our Top 10 tag.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Italy – Phasmatodea
Location: Italy (near Viterbo)
October 31, 2010 4:48 pm
Hello Bugman,
I saw this stick-bug yesterday (I believe it is called Phasmatodea). I thought you may be interested in this. I was.
Bye
Signature: Saverio

Walkingstick

Hi Saverio,
Thanks so much for sending your photo.  We don’t get many submissions from Italy.  We commonly call Phasmids Walkingsticks in North America.  We did a bit of research and learned on the University of Groningen website that:  “In Europe, some ten species can be found in the Mediterranean region
” and that some of them have been reclassified into a new genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Haitian bug
Location: Haitia
October 31, 2010 8:55 pm
Hi, i would like to identify this bug by curiosity. I know this picture was taken in haitia, between 2-3 inch long without the abdomen antena. Well i cant wait to know more about this one 🙂 thank you
Signature: Xavier Fleurant

Giant Vinegaroon

Hello Xavier,
This fierce looking but harmless creature is a Giant Vinegaroon, a name we prefer to the name Whipscorpion because that conjures up the impression that it is a venomous creature, which it is not.  Giant Vinegaroons are shy, nocturnal hunters that feast on Cockroaches and other undesirable creatures that they encounter on their nightly hunts.  The common name Vinegaroon refers to the creature’s habit of expelling a weak solution of acetic acid when threatened which smells like vinegar, another form of acetic acid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed Note November 1, 2010: We just discovered this blog posting, and though it is theoretically not a letter that was submitted to the website, Daniel was thrilled to read it.

My super last minute grainy sleepyhead SciFri post!
This week I went to a seminar given by a Wildlife Ecologist and Entomologist from the University of Delaware and before the seminar the campus bookstore had a booth set up selling his book and a few other books, one of those other books being The Curious World of Bugs by Daniel Marlos and though I NEVER pay full price for books (because I’m always buying them so if I always paid full price I would be super broke) I decided I had to have this book right then. I’m flying through it because it’s so interesting. I wasn’t all that interested in insects until I got my job at the entomology lab and now I think they are some of the coolest creatures ever, especially after learning more from this book. Maybe I’m a Wildlife Ecologist/Entomologist in the making…
http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/scifri

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this bug
Location: Aliso Viejo, California
November 1, 2010 3:06 am
Hi,
I was walking along when I saw this thing, it looks like a giant ant, it was well over 1.5 inches. I was wondering what it was, and my friend said it could be _____ (spanish name) and that it’s poisonous and if you see its tummy, it looks like a baby’s face. Is this true?
Thank you!
Signature: Kitty

Potato Bug

Hi Kitty,
We just posted a letter yesterday of a Potato Bug sighting.  These are legendary insects in Southern California and they are also found in numerous other locations in western North America.  The recent unseasonal rains is causing them to emerge from their normally subterranean burrows, making them more visible.  There are many superstitions regarding the Potato Bug, which is also known as the Jerusalem Cricket.  In Spanish it is called Niña de la Tierra or Child of the Earth and it is not poisonous, though it does have strong jaws and could theoretically produce a painful bite.  They are not dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination