From the monthly archives: "November 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unidentified Moth in Virginia
Location: Craig County, Virginia
November 2, 2010 1:27 pm
I found this moth sitting on a branch while hiking in Craig County, VA. I took this picture of it on a 70-degree late October day. When we approached the moth, it spread its wings out and revealed its ”furry” abdomen, which had black and reddish-orange horizontal stripes. It was approximately one inch in length. I thought it might be some type of tiger moth, however could not find any images that matched it. I hope you are able to help with the identification!
Signature: Jessie

Buck Moth

Hi Jessie,
You have submitted a Buck Moth,
Hemileuca maia, a species that, according to BugGuide, is “Said to fly rapidly at mid-day through oak forests.”  The adults are seasonal, and tend to fly in October and November, though in the north, they are found in September, and in the extreme south they may be found as late as December.  The flight of the adults coincides with deer hunting season, and the common name probably has its origin with buck hunters seeing the moths in the oak forests while hunting.  Adults do not feed, and they have a very short life.  They die soon after mating and reproducing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this!?
Location: Southern New Jersey
November 2, 2010 6:50 pm
These bugs seem to have come out of an oak tree we’ve had chopped down. Between an inch to two inches long, 6 legs, large abdomen. What are they and What should we do about them?
Signature: Shannah

Oil Beetle

Hi Shannah,
This is an Oil Beetle and you should let them live.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx?
Subject: Green Lynx?
Location: Sierra Madre, California
November 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Here’s a momma spider with recently hatched babies. My uncle thinks it’s a Green Lynx spider. You agree?
Signature: John

Green Lynx Spider defends her Spiderlings

Hi John,
You are absolutely correct in your identification of a Green Lynx Spider.  This is our personal favorite spider and we are in awe of the maternal aggression exhibited by the female while she is guarding her egg sac and her newly hatched Spiderlings.  The Green Lynx Spider is a common spider in Southern California and the adult spiders are often found on blossoms awaiting the arrival of pollinating insects.  It is our observation that the male spiders are frequently attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Oh please let this not be a bed bug
Location: Manhattan
November 3, 2010 5:34 am
I got bitten by a mosquito while sleeping and got up to chase the little bugger. While chasing him around I found this on the floor of the living room scurrying across the carpet.
Ive checked my bed and my couch as best I can and don’t see anything else, but i do live in times square nyc, so im terrified.
Please notice that unlike all the bedbug pics i see online this thing has long antenna and 2 little points sticking out from rear of abdomen.
abdomen does have ridges like the expandable one of a bed bug.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Signature: Sleepless

Cockroach Nymph

Dear Sleepless,
We rue the day that Bed Bug infestations went viral on the internet.  Now it seems every day several letters with images of dead insects attached arrive in our mailbox with a subject line very similar to your subject line.  This is not a Bed Bug, but a few years ago, we would have expected this exact subject line ending in Cockroach, which is what you have found.  Revulsion is relative.  Where once Cockroaches ruled when it came to being the most reviled insect that horrified the web browsing public, the Cockroach has been displaced by the Bed Bug.  Ads for Bed Bug extermination are ubiquitous and it seems there are stories on the news with great regularity regarding the current plague.  The media coverage is fueling the paranoia.  While we acknowledge that Bed Bugs are quite unpleasant, and a difficult problem to eradicate, and that they are being reported in increasing numbers, we get very few confirmed identification requests for the little biters of bedtime lore.  Though our Bed Bug category has 15 posts, many are informational only and were not identification requests.  We began this online column ten years ago and the website 8 years ago and we have posted only 8 images of Bed Bugs or related species like Bat Bugs in that time, though we also acknowledge that we are unable to answer all the mail that we receive.  In actuality, many of the blurry images we receive might have been Bed Bugs. With that said, it seems Cockroaches are reproducing in the vicinity of your home, and the individual in your photo may have siblings or other relatives nearby.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Need info on this beetle.
Location: Statesville, NC
November 2, 2010 6:40 am
My son is a Cub Scout and we have to do some research on an animal, plant or insect that lives off of another source of food. He wanted to do this one seeing as though we found these on the outside of our home. What are these? I can’t seem to locate them anywhere…I personally love the skull on their backs, although I am not sure if that is truly what the design is. Any help would be great!
Signature: Thank you, Nikki

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs eat Cricket

Hi Nikki,
These are not beetles.  They are immature Florida Predatory Stink Bugs and they are eating a Cricket.  As they mature, these Stink Bugs will stop hunting in a pack.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Fly
Location: Yakima, WA
November 1, 2010 4:18 pm
Biggest dipteran I’ve ever seen.
Signature: Paul Huffman, President-for-Life, Moclips Surf Club

Bot Fly

Hi Paul,
We strongly believed that you had submitted an image of a Bot Fly in the family Oestridae, but most individuals we have identified in the past are marked with black and white patches similar to the patterns on a Holstein milk cow.  We quickly found a matching photo on BugGuide that is identified as the Bot Fly
Cuterebra tenebrosa, and Natalie McNear from Marin County California who submitted the photo wrote:  “Looking on here it most closely resembles the New World skin bot flies of the subfamily Cuterebrinae, but I don’t see any on here that are all dark with a metallic blue abdomen.”  There is a comment by Jeff Boettner on the posting that indicates:  “I am pretty confident this one is likely Cuterebra tenebrosa. There are a few other species that have all black females, but you have shots from all angles, so likely this is correct. The bot uses Neotoma (wood rats) as a host. … There is a very robust comment dialog on that posting that is well worth the time to read.  The genus information page on BugGuide provides this information on the life cycle of the Bot Flies:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and ‘runs’ of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result. Bot Flies are also known as Warble Flies. These Bot Flies really are quite large and they resemble bumble bees in both appearance and sound.

Bot Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination