What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Underwing Moth
Location: Ancaster, Ontario
November 16, 2010 4:58 am
This underwing invited itself into the house and I took the photos in June of this year. I captured it in a vase to get a closer look and to take some pictures of it (and also to keep my cats from eating it) and then let it go back outside.
I love their aerodynamic little faces.
Signature: Cheryl-Anne

Greater Yellow Underwing

Hi Cheryl-Anne,
We nearly went dizzy scrolling through all the individuals in the Owlet Moth family Noctuidae on the Moth Photographers Group which does not recognize the newer taxonomy on BugGuide of the superfamily Noctuoidae.  This is one large family or superfamily, but we finally found
Noctua pronuba on the Moth Photographers Group on Plate 33 (Noctuidae, Noctuinae), and it matches your moth.  BugGuide identifies Noctua pronuba by the common names Greater Yellow Underwing, Large Yellow Underwing or Winter Cutworm (larva) and states that it was:  “Introduced from Europe to Nova Scotia in 1979, this species has since spread north to the Arctic Ocean, west to the Pacific, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.

Greater Yellow Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Canada

One Response to Greater Yellow Underwing

  1. Dave says:

    Edibility update.
    The caterpillars of these moths are definitely edible; I suspect that the adults are also, and I’ve read several accounts of people making tea out of moths. Intriguing.

    Dave
    http://www.smallstockfoods.com

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