From the monthly archives: "July 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cicada Killer in Mass
July 28, 2010 7:22 pm
I have a Cicada Killer in SE Mass, the time table and territory shows Cicadas not here, and not due around this year. Am I wrong or are they sustained on nectar in the off years (and shes lost)?
Colby Crossman

Hi Colby,
There are cicadas in your area every year.  Do not confuse the special appearance of the Periodical Cicada or 17 Year Locust that appear on a periodic schedule with the Annual Cicadas that appear each year.  The Periodical Cicadas, when they do appear, are about a month earlier than the appearance of Cicada Killers, so the Periodical Cicadas do not contribute to the diet of Cicada Killers which tend to feed on the Annual Cicadas that appear in mid to late summer.  It is also worth noting that only the larval Cicada Killers feed on the Cicadas which are paralyzed by the female Cicada Killer to provision her nest with food for her brood.  Adults take nectar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A black soldier fly?
Location:  South Pasadena, CA
July 29, 2010 12:34 am
I would have thought this was a wasp, but it showed up around the same time the larva appeared in the composter. I saw you didn’t have a picture of a mature one.
Barbara

Black Soldier Fly

Hi Barbara,
Thanks for sending us your photo of a Black Soldier Fly or Window Fly,
Hermetia illucens.  You can see BugGuide for more information.  Interestingly, one was on our front porch screen door two mornings ago, but we have two very active compost piles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Leaf Beetles » Chrysomelinae » Calligrapha » Calligrapha vicina
Location:  Gananoque, Ontario, Canada
July 27, 2010 8:54 pm
I stumbled across this lovely site tonight, and was very please to finally figure out what little bug I found in my backyard. I thought it was a variation of a ladybug I had never seen before, but between your site and bugguide.net that was referenced in an article here, I have narrowed it down to being a Leaf Beetle in the Calligrapha Vicina category. Although it is not great quality, I thought I would pass along the picture I was able to take with my phone before the beetle took off. I found this in SouthEastern Ontario in mid July 2010.
Debra

Leaf Beetle

Hi Debra,
Congratulations on your being successful in the identification of this Leaf Beetle in the genus
Calligrapha.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Los Angeles bug
Location:  Los Angeles, CA
July 27, 2010 9:11 pm
I live near Griffith Park in LA and I’m familiar with most of the bugs that stop by my home office. But this dude was new to me. Haven’t found anything similar in Kaufman or Hogue’s guide to LA bugs. The stumpy wings on the top suggest an immature flying bug? Body was about 3/4 inch long.
Matthew Butterick

Immature Leaf Footed Bug

Hi Matthew,
Sadly, most guide books do not have images of many immature phases of insect metamorphosis.  This is an immature Leaf Footed Bug, and it appears that it is a species in the genus
Leptoglossus based on photos like this posted to BugGuide.

Immature Leaf Footed Bug

Thanks Daniel. Do you think it might be an Acanthocephala terminalis?
The third picture on this page of the immature A. terminalis is a close match for my photo.
http://www.hartmanprehistoricgarden.com/sa-acanthocephala_ter.html

Hi Matthew,
We are going to stick to
Leptoglossus, but as we already stated, nymphs can be difficult to conclusively identify.  According to BugGuide, Acanthocephala terminalis, does not range in California.  We would favor Leptoglossus clypealis as the species.  BugGuide has an image of the adult showing the long proboscis, similar to the proportions of your specimen.  The distinguishing feature mentioned on BugGuide:  “A spine extending forwards from the tip of the nose (technically known as the tylus) distinguishes this species” is not clearly visible in your photographs, but that might be because it is immature or it could be the angle of view of your photos.

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French mystery moth.
Location:  Montpelier, southern France
July 27, 2010 12:21 pm
My sister recently found this moth in her garden. She lives near Montpelier in southern France. Could you identify it please,as it is not listed in any of my moth reference books.
Thankyou.
Nigel Harland

Possibly Fruit Piercing Moth

Hi Nigel,
We believe you may have photographed a Fruit Piercing Moth based on its appearance, though we are not certain if Fruit Piercing Moths are found in France.  Here is a link to an Australian species.  We are posting your letter and photos in the hope that one of our readers can supply any supporting or contradicting information.

Possibly Fruit Piercing Moth

Karl researches the Answer
Hi Daniel and Nigel:
This was very tricky one because it does look like an Underwing or Fruit-piercing Moth – and it is in the wrong hemisphere! I was able to track it down only because it reminded me of a species of Castnia that I photographed in Costa Rica last winter. It is actually a Castniid moth (Castniidae), a small and mostly neotropical family of day-flying moths (a few species in Australia and Asia). They are also called Butterfly Moths and are often mistaken for butterflies. The species is Paysandisia archon and according to Wikipedia:  “It is native to Uruguay and central Argentina and has been accidentally introduced to Europe, where it is spreading rapidly. It is considered the only member of the genus Paysandisia.”  The larvae are palm borers and are considered a serious pest. The spread of this species is being closely tracked in France and several other Mediterranean countries and it is likely that someone may be interested in this sighting. Regards. Karl

Hello Daniel and Karl,
Thankyou both so much for getting a positive identification on this moth, it appears to be quite a rarity.
Thanks again,
Nigel Harland.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Water Strider
Location:  North Middle Tennessee
July 27, 2010 4:33 pm
Hi Daniel,
Took a trek down to the creek today here are some water striders from the trip. They are very common around here but have always caught my interest. From my childhood memories they are very difficult to catch, from today they are difficult to photograph. Thank You for all that you do and have a wonderful day.
Richard

Water Strider

Hi Richard,
Thanks for sending us your images of Water Striders so we can provide them for our readership.  They are fascinating to watch as they skate across the surface of ponds and streams while waiting for luckless insects to fall in, providing them with a meal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination