What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Yellow moth with a face
May 4, 2010
Hi Bugman!
I have a new moth/caterpillar from Jakarta, Indonesia.

Moth

My housekeeper found the caterpillar munching on guava leaves. After two days it made the silk bag and pupated – from April 15 till this am. I have not seen this moth before. I found lots of silk bags on the trees but, they have a little role and the pupa is dried up inside.
MiriamR.
Kemang, South Jakarta, Indonesia

Moth Caterpillar

Hi Miriam,
WE have not had any luck quickly trying to locate your moth on Bill Oehlke’s comprehensive website, nor on the Wild Silkmoths of Indonesia website.  The closest match is the genus Cricula, but that does not look correct to us.  Hopefully, we will be able to provide you with an answer, either by contacting Bill Oehlke, or by having one of our readers supply a response.

Update:
Bill Oehlke just wrote to us that this is NOT a Giant Silkmoth.  HMMMM.  What could it be?

Ryan and Mr. Goodwraith provide identifications
Not a saturniid, but a member of  Lasiocampoidea. This is a female Trabala pallida.
Ryan

I’m sure ryan’s right. Compare with the specimen shown at http://www.malaeng.com/blog/?p=5898. The placement of the markings seems distinctive for T. pallida.
Mr. Goodwraith

Ed. Note: The Lasiocampoidea are known as Tent Caterpillars and Lappet Moths.

Update:
May 5, 2010
Wow, Mr. Goodwraith! This is the first female that I get- I had a male about a month ago – it was smaller than the female, and even the caterpillar looked a little different.  They seem to eat just about anything they fall on to.
Thanks whatsthatbug!
Miriam

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

5 Responses to Mystery: Unknown Moth from Indonesia

  1. ryan says:

    Not a saturniid, but a member of Lasiocampoidea. This is a female Trabala pallida.

  2. ryan says:

    And if not Trabala pallida, then another species in the genus.

  3. Mr. Goodwraith says:

    I’m sure ryan’s right. Compare with the specimen shown at http://www.malaeng.com/blog/?p=5898. The placement of the markings seems distinctive for T. pallida.

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