From the monthly archives: "February 2010"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

February 24, 2010
Giant Water Bugs
Hi, WTB,
I’ve been going through photos from last summer and I thought that you might be interested in some Giant Water Bug images that have a little more detail (including particulate gunk in the water — sorry for that) than is sometimes seen in field photographs.
The first image gives an idea of the male behavior of, what seems to be, aerating/hydrating (and, perhaps, cleansing?) the eggs by rapidly moving his back in and out of the water.

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

The second shot shows a submerged male with all of the eggs, and only the eggs, above the surface.

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

The third photo is of a completely submerged male and eggs.  You just can see the very tip of his backside breaking the surface.

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

The final shot is of a, presumably, female — totally submerged — who is feeding “up” on the food chain.
Early July, foothills of the Santa Rita Mountains, southern Arizona, about 4,400 ft.
Denny Schreffler

Giant Water bug with Prey

Dear Denny,
You are continuing a pattern of excellence with both your photos and your verbal descriptions.  These documentations of a Male Giant Water Bug in the genus Abedus, probably Abedus herberti which BugGuide reports is found in Arizona, are positively spectacular.  The focus and detail are superb, and the observational information on the aeration/hydrating/cleaning behavior of the male with the eggs is a wonderful addition.  The Giant Water Bugs in the genera Abedus and Belestoma are interesting in that the female cements the eggs to the back of the male after mating, and the male has the responsibility of protecting the eggs, though once the eggs hatch, he is freed of his duties.  Thanks so much for including the information that the photos were taken in July, because so often our readers submit images that are many years old and they fail to include such relevant information.  Though your photos are quite detailed, you neglected to indicate what prey was captured in the Food Chain image, other than that it is up the food chain.  Is it possible to provide that information?

I don’t know what fleshy little vertebrate morsel she is eating — I came upon her after she already had been through the carry out line — but it probably tastes like chicken.
Thanks for the nice comments.
Denny Schreffler

Eric Eaton Agrees with identification
Hi, Daniel:
The giant water bugs from Denny here in Arizona are the species Abedus herberti.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Winter Caterpillar
February 24, 2010
Hello Bugman,
I am a follower of your website for several years now. I moved to Canada recently, and have been exploring around Thames River. I came across this caterpillar in the snow in London Ontario.
It was little more than an inch in length. At first I thought it was dead, so I photographed it as it was (first picture). Later when I came back to explore, it had moved almost 3 feet from its location (picture 2) in about 45 minutes, and was on the snow (picture 3)!
This surprised me. I am aware of hibernating caterpillars, but the fact that this fellow was out in the open caught my attention.
Can you help me identify it? Is it a Noctuid caterpillar?
Sincerely,
Ani
London ON, Canada

Winter Cutworm

Hi Ani,
Last month we received a similar letter from New England, and our faithful reader Karl helped us identify it as a Winter Cutworm, Noctua pronuba, an invasive species that was introduced from Europe.

Winter Cutworm

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so very much for the response! I have been coming across heaps of invasive species in the wild, compared to native species over here, which is very sad!
Thank you again for the information, I really appreciate it!
Keep up the good work!
Sincerely,
Ani

Hi again Ani,
We believe you will find that the spread and proliferation of exotic imported opportunistic species is not limited to Canada, but is a phenomenon that we are seeing worldwide due to human migration.  There probably is not a scientist on the planet that will be able to accurately predict the extent of the dire consequences this will have on species diversity, and many endemic species are becoming endangered or extinct at an alarming rate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth/fly
February 24, 2010
Was seen in Goa India in January this year
GMT58
Central Goa, India

Wasp Moth: Euchromia polymena

Dear GMT58,
This is surely a gorgeous Wasp Moth, one of the Arctiid Moths in, we suspect, the Tribe Euchromiini.  We quickly found a matching photograph on the India Nature Watch website, and they are identified as Day Flying Moths, Euchromia elegantissima, with a link to the Moths of Borneo website.  The Cambodian Bugs website also has some photos of this elegant beauty.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks ever so much for your help,
regards,
Tony

Correction:  January 23, 2014
We just received a comment indicating that this is actually a different species in the same genus: 
Euchromia polymena.  We located a photo on the TrekNature that supports that comment.

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unknown creature concave bug- very ugly
February 24, 2010
i found them in my place so i would like to know what are they.
cannot find any ID so please help.
quite big creatures usually transparent up to 7-8 mm big.
thanks
Lazar from Slovenia
Ljubljana

Pigeon Tick

Hi Lazar,
This is a Tick, and its concave shape indicates it is hungry for blood.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
BUT HOW CAN THIS TICK BE SO BIG?? AND WHY THEY LIVE IN MY FLAT?? AND THEY ARE FAST WHILE TICKS ARE SLOW.
I KNOW WHAT ARE TICKS. I AM FROM VILLAGE AND I KNOW THIS RACES..USUALLY HUMAN AND DOG TICKS..ALL HAVE SOME KIND OF A BAG FOR A BLOOD
THIS ONE HAS NO SUCH THING AND ALSO THERE IS NO MOUTH! IF YOU TURN IT JUST PLAIN SHAPE WITHOUT STING MOUTH.
ALSO THIS ARE CREATURES TO 1 CM AND THAT IS FAAAR FAAAR TOO BIG. HUMAN TICKS I KNOW THEY ARE FROM 0,05 CM TO 0,1 CM AND I GET PLENTY OF THEM BECAUSE I GO REGULAR IN SEARCH OF MUSHROOMS AND METAL DETECTING. DOG  TICKS ARE QUITE BIGGER AND IN NORMAL SIZE THEY ARE ABOUT 0,2 CM TO 0,4 CM. WHEN THEY ARE FULL OF BLOOD I KNOW THEY ARE MASSIVE- UP TO 2 CM!! NOT GOOD IN US GRADE SO I TELL IN EUROPEAN METRIC.
I CAUGHT THIS DOG TICKS IN BOSNIA ONLY. BUT I SEE THEM INSTANTLY AND HAD NO BITES TILL NOW! BUT I PULL THEM OFTEN FROM A DOG.
SO THIS MY CREATURE IS ALREADY IN NORMAL SIZE 1 CM!!! THAT IS A SIZE OF A HALF FULL DOG TICK. AND IF THEY HAD OPPORTUNITY TO SUCK BLOOD THEY WOULD BE AT LEAST 5 CM BIG!! THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE!??
IT IS A SHAME I DIDN’T TURN IT AROUND SO I CAN SHOW YOU THAT IT IS A PLAIN SHAPE WITHOUT SEPARATION AND PLACE FOR A BLOOD BAG.
PLEASE IF YOU CAN TELL ME WHAT IS GOING ON I WOULD BE VERY HAPPY! THEY LIVE IN MY APARTMENT AND I AM NOT HAPPY!
AND I LIVE IN 4th FLOOR!!!
PLEASE TELL ME SOME GOOD NEWS BECAUSE MY ROOMMATE IS FREAKING OUT- SHE GONNA KILL ME :-S
THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR HELPING ME
HOPE IT IS NOT A NEW KIND BECAUSE IT IS TOO UGLY TO HAVE MY NAME!
LAZAR

Hi again Lazar,
This comment just arrived.
Daniel

Faithful Reader Karl identifies another one
I think this could be a Pigeon Tick (Argas reflexus), a common tick of central and southern Europe. They usually feed on pigeons, but if none are available they may also feed on other birds or, rarely, humans. Do you perhaps have pigeons nesting in your eaves or attic? Like most ticks, they can transmit some diseases, and apparently can cause problems for people who have an allergy to their bights. By its size I would say this one is a female.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Argas_reflexus.jpg
http://www.ambitec.de/schaedlinge/insekten/taubenzecke/index.html

THANK YOU THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
NOW I KNOW WHY I HAVE SO MUCH PROBLEMS WITH ALLERGIES!
WISH YOU ALL GOOD AND BEST REGARDS
LAZAR

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tarantula
February 23, 2010
Wondering what species this is – common and latin name
David
Chira Island, Costa Rica

Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula

Dear David,
We quickly found a matching photo identified as a Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula, Aphonopelma seemanni,
on the Tarantula Photo Gallery website.  The Tarantula’s Burrow website has a care sheet on the species.  Arachnopets indicates an alternate name is the Stripe Knee Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider from Guizhou, China
February 24, 2010
Hi there,
This is a spider that lives on my wifes farm in Guizhou, China (northern, near Chongqing). They are everywhere. They are quite thin (flat) and manage to squeeze behind almost anything that does not move often.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
Kerry
Anchang, Guizhou, China

Flattie from China

Hi Kerry,
This is a member of the family Selenopidae, which BugGuide refers to as the Flatties, a name that is quite appropriate considering your confirming description.  According to the Biodiversity Explorer website, they are also called Wall Crab Spiders, and they are harmless.  We don’t think we will be able to provide you with a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination