From the monthly archives: "February 2010"

fat orange bug
February 4, 2010
fat thick body orange bug with eye shaped patterns on its wings. didn’t move around much and was able to expand it’s wings open using a piece of grass
what?
south florida

Io Moth

Dear what?,
This is a female Io Moth.  She can be distinguished from the male of the species because the male has yellow upper wings.

Io Moth

six legged worm thing?
February 2, 2010
Im not sure what this thing is it was found in my back yard and its a little over 2 inches long and fairly thick it has fuzz on it and it must burrow because when i put it in the grass again it starting moving down. when its flipped right side up it roles onto its back and begins to wiggle normally. it has a dark colored head not sure if its dark red but it does have pincers and there’s something inside its tail maybe a sack its black and white. I’m not to fond of insects but i;d like to know what this is because Ive never seen one before.
Luis Martinez
Los Angeles California

Crawly-Back

Hi Luis,
This is the larva of a Green Fruit Beetle, Cotinus mutabilis.  They are often found in compost piles and they are known as Crawly-Backs.  The beautiful green adults fly in August, and because they feed on fruit, they are sometimes called Figeaters.

Crawly-Back

Mystery Bug with Pincers and Long Stinger
February 4, 2010
We’ve found bugs with boxing-glove pincers which unroll into giant jaws. See attached photos. We’re in a house in Jakarta, Java, Indonesia. Have found two of them so far. We’ll keep the lights on until you tell it’s safe. Can you help identify it?
Brits and Red Socks abroad.
Jakarta, Java, Indonesia.

Vinegaroon

Hi Brits and Red Socks abroad,
This is a harmless Whipscorpion in the order Thelyphonida.  They are also called Vinegaroons because they release a weak acetic acid when threatened, and it smells like vinegar.  Since they have no venom, Whipscorpions are perfectly harmless, despite resembling scorpions.  You may read more about Whipscorpions on Wikipedia, and we also found an Indonesian website called Greater White with good photos.  The drawing on Wikipedia resembles your specimen, and it is from the genus Thelyphonus.  There are several Indonesian members of that genus.  The jaws you describe are actually modified legs known as pedipalps.  We are thankful for your awesome images that document the two positions of the pedipalps.  Since Vinegaroons are harmless, and they are nocturnal hunters, it is safe to turn out the lights when you sleep.  The foraging Vinegaroons will help keep the population of cockroaches and spiders to a minimum.

Vinegaroon

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for this awesome answer. “Whipscorpion” is such a great name!
The photos I sent to you were very low resolution. If you would like better quality ones for the records, I’d be happy to whisk them over to you this weekend.
Very best wishes to you and the bug team. And thanks for inspiring a sudden fascination for bugs from my housemates and I.
Melanie

Bug infestation in living room
February 3, 2010
These bugs have started showing up about 2-3 weeks ago maybe 10-20 a day. Recently there have been 100 a day maybe. At the start they all seemed to die within the same day of showing up (by themselves no pesticide used) and have never reached any other rooms. But now they have gotten to the front door entry way and into the basement. I sweep them all up everyday but they never seem to stop multiplying.
The bug look like flying ants but I have never seen one fly even though they have wings. They are maybe 1 cm long not very big at all.
I think they are coming out of the baseboards against a wall against the dinner room area, which is a split leveled wall (so only about 3 feet high). I have never seen these in my house before after living here for 5-6 years.
Dave Brown
Southern Ontario, Canada

Flying Carpenter Ant

Hi Dave,
We agree that this appears to be a flying ant, more specifically, a Carpenter Ant.  We suspect you have a colony in the baseboards.  The colony does not produce reproductive flying kings and queens until it has matured, and we suspect that after six years in the home with your growing colony, it has matured to the point that the colony has finally produced a reproductive swarm.  Compare your image to the higher resolution images posted to BugGuide.

What is this bug?
February 1, 2010
Hello bugman,
These interesting and very colorful bugs are all over my house. They seem to be attracted to the white walls of my house. In my front yard I have two bottlebrush trees, one stringy bark gum and some lily pily shrubs. Happy to let the little bug live all over my house….. but i would appreciate a little more info. Regards
Luke
Gold Coast, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.

Green Jewel Bug nymph, possibly

Good Morning Luke,
This is an immature Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae.  We believe it may be Lampromicra senator, the Green Jewel Bug, but alas, we are only able to locate images of adult insects.  You may look on the Brisbane Insect Website, or the Save Our Waterways Now website for photos of the adults.  Perhaps someone will write in to confirm this identification, or perhaps provide a link to images of the immature Green Jewel Bug nymph.

Green Jewel Bug nymph, possibly

An Australian Cicada?
February 3, 2010
Hello Bugman,
I’ve just published a blog post on a cicada (?) I found in our garden. I don’t seem to be able to identify it, so I’m in need of help, please.
The post is at theridoureport.blogspot.com
There’re quite a few posts on bugs and critters I’ve found in our garden and inside – you can find all of them, if you click on the label ‘bugs’. Thanks in advance.
Ridou Ridou
Sydney, Australia

Palm Planthopper

Dear Ridou Ridou,
This appears to be a Palm Planthopper, Magia subocellata, one of the Lophopid Planthoppers in the family Lophopidae.  The Planthoppers are related to the Cicadas, hence your confusion.  We identified your Palm Planthopper on the Brisbane Insect PageFlickr has a nice image that shows the colors well, but the dead mounted specimens on the New South Wales Government website have lost their lovely blue and green coloration.

Palm Planthopper

Well done, I’m impressed!  Ridou Ridou

P.S.  We would love some of those lovely profile shots from your blog to post on our site.

Palm Planthopper

Hi Daniel, here are the photos…  Ridou Ridou

Palm Planthopper

PS. I contacted Dr Fletcher from Orange Agricultural Institute about the Planthopper, and as a consequence he added my photo of it to their website:
“Lovely pictures of Magia subocellata (Family Lophopidae). This species (and one other species of Magia) is native to North Queensland. It was found a couple of years ago in the tropical palm collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney and may well have spread to your area from there.”
http://www1.dpi.nsw.gov.au/keys/fulgor/species/magiasub.html
Ridou Ridou
Sydney, Australia