From the monthly archives: "January 2010"

Belizian Bug
January 25, 2010
I found this bug January 10th 2009, on edge of clearing in the Chiqual Rainforest. There where several ranging in length from 1 to 2cm in length.
Also I am sorry If i already sent you this before but I am not sure if my last message got sent.
Becky
Belize

Immature Treehopper

Hi Becky,
This is an immature Free Living Hemipteran, probably a Treehopper in the family Membracidae.  We will try to find a species match for you.  Here is a link to a photo of a North American species posted to BugGuide.

Bugs found in apartment
January 24, 2010
Hi Bugman,
I found two bugs near the crown molding on the floor of my apartment. I’ve attached pictures of the one. It is black on top with a beige sort of stripe, with a few white dots on it. The other bug I found had part of the beige stripe, but it was not as distinct.
Thanks, Phils Fan
PA

Carpet Beetle

Dear Phils Fan,
This is a Carpet Beetle, Anthrenus pimpinellae.  We identified it on BugGuide where it is stated that it has a cosmopolitan distribution.  The genus page on BugGuide states:  “Season Adults mainly occurr in spring, but may be found the whole year round in heated rooms.
Food Adults feed pollen on flowers; larvae feed keratine and chitine, and may cause considerable damage on wool, fur, feathers, and natural history collections.

two beetles? one fly?
January 24, 2010
1.blue beetle in botanic garden Canberra
2.golden beetle Burramine, Murray Valley Hwy vic. on the ground
3. fly Woodend vic in a garden
elise
victoria Nsw

Leaf Beetle

Hi Elise,
We only like to post one species per letter to keep our archives from being too confusing.
Your blue beetle is some species of Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  None of the species on the Brisbane Insect website seem to match your beetle. We believe we found a matching image on the OZ Animals website, but it is listed as unidentified, possibly in the genus Lilioceris. Perhaps it is an introduced species.  Your golden beetle is a Christmas Beetle in the genus Anoplognathus and the fly is a Robber Fly.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your quick answer. I just spent a few weeks in Australia and now I am back in the snow in the Netherlands.
Since eveything, every flower, every animal is different from here I have a lot of “research” to do.
I had a book for trees, for flowers, for animals. for birds, but not for insects.
Is there a website that can help me find out by myself what the creatures on my photos are?
Being totally ignorant in australian buglife I probably saw only the very very common insects.
If I have more questions I’ll send them one by one.
Elise

Thanks for the additional information Elise.  Your original letter was so spare and lacking in information that we thought providing you with family information would suffice.  We are not scientists and often exact species identification is difficult for us.  Since receiving your reply, we have posted a second beetle image in a separate posting, but we could not get exact identification.  All of our replies have contained links with websites we use.  You may try additional web searching the same way that we do if the family name isn’t exact for you.  Otherwise, you can continue to check into our website to see if any of our readers post an identification to this Leaf Beetle.  Since we cannot retain email addresses for perpetuity, we strongly recommend adding a comment to your postings through our website and then if any additional postings come in some time in the future, you will automatically be notified.  Csiro Publishing is advertising an Insects of Australia book for sale that might be helpful.

Karl identifies the Leaf Beetle
Hi Daniel and Elise:
I think this could be a Blue Metallic Flea Beetle (Altica pagana). That may not be the exact species since there are several in that genus in Australia, but I believe it is pretty close. Although yours appears to be a single individual, they tend to gather in large clusters. Many flea beetles are considered agricultural pests but I could find nothing to suggest that the Blue Metallic Flea Beetle falls into that category. They are reported to feed on members of the Rosacea family. Regards.
Karl

Yes, I think that is it.  Thank you Daniel and Karl. I found this http://www.flickr.com/photos/nuytsia_pix/3653712810/in/photostream/ that confirms it.
I thought WTB to be australian, but it is american. Are you ‘doing’ bugs for the ‘whole world’? Regards,
Elise

Hi again Elise,
The offices of What’s That Bug? are based in Los Angeles California, but we will attempt to identify anything that comes our way, time permitting.  Our readership and contributors may be found anywhere the world wide web reaches.

two beetles? one fly?
January 24, 2010
1.blue beetle in botanic garden Canberra
2.golden beetle Burramine, Murray Valley Hwy vic. on the ground
3. fly Woodend vic in a garden
elise
victoria Nsw

Christmas Beetle

Hi Elise,
We only like to post one species per letter to keep our archives from being too confusing.  Your golden beetle is a Christmas Beetle in the genus Anoplognathus.  They get their common name because they arrive like clockwork each year around Christmas in Australia.  Csiro has a nice web page with information.  Your blue beetle is some species of Leaf Beetle and the fly is a Robber Fly.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your quick answer. I just spent a few weeks in Australia and now I am back in the snow in the Netherlands.
Since eveything, every flower, every animal is different from here I have a lot of “research” to do.
I had a book for trees, for flowers, for animals. for birds, but not for insects.
Is there a website that can help me find out by myself what the creatures on my photos are?
Being totally ignorant in australian buglife I probably saw only the very very common insects.
If I have more questions I’ll send them one by one.
Elise

Stripey bug in Yellowstone
January 24, 2010
I visited Yellowstone NP in September 2009 and saw a rather cute bug. I am just sorting my photos out now and wondered what this bug is. It landed on my car side-mirror as I stopped for a photo.
Dee
Yellowstone NP

White Spotted Sawyer

Hi Dee,
This is a White Spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus.  The White Spotted Sawyer can be distinguished from its close relatives by the white scutellum.  The scutellum is the white triangular spot at the front of the elytra or wingcovers, on the thorax.  It is found in coniferous forests, and according to BugGuide, it has a:  “Two-year life cycle. Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc. Common hosts are: Balsam fir, spruces and white pine.

unidentified Mexican butterfly Jan. 2010
January 24, 2010
Thank you for the ID of the Many Banded Daggerwing. This smaller, orange, black and white beauty was in the same area on the Mexican Yucatan peninsula. I am hoping you can tell me more.
fparker
Mexico Yucatan area

Silver Emperor

Hi again fparker,
Before we clicked and enlarged your photo, we thought it might be a California Sister, but clearly it is not, nor is it a Lorquin’s Admiral which it also resembles.  Your butterfly is a Silver Emperor, Doxocopa laure, and we believe it is a male, though your photo does not show the bright blue irridescence when the light strikes the wings at the correct angle.  The North American Butterfly Association of North Texas has a nice page on this species.  According to BugGuide, the species is “Sexually dimorphic upperwing patterns. Females have a diagonal white slash across both wings, and a yellow spot near the forewing apex; extremely similar to female Pavon Emperor but this species has a broader white stripe with a rounded tip. Male has a stripe across its upperwings but is white only on hindwings, turns yellow on forwings. Underwing pattern is similar to upperwing but less distinct and with a grayish or silvery cast overall.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Adults visit rotting and overripe fruit, sap, animal dung, and carrion. Larvae feed on foliage of hackberries and sugarberries.”  Thanks for contributing another new species to our website.