What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Praying Mantis laying eggs
January 10, 2010
Dear what’s that bug,
my best wishes for the New Year in order to continue your great job. I found this adult female praying mantis at 25th of December 2009.

Unknown Preying Mantis

 Preying Mantis

Its length is approximately 2cm (0.79inch) and it gave birth at 5th of January 2010. Except of the identification, is it possible to tell me for how long will it live and around what season will the eggs hatch? Are there any special conditions that I should preserve the eggs? Many thanks for your life saving assistance…
Praying Mantis laying eggs
Southern Greece, Northwest of the island of Crete, Municipality of Chania, Kastelli

Mantis laying Ootheca

Mantis laying Ootheca

We are uncertain of the species, and we spent a bit of time trying to research Greek mantises.  This is a small mantis, and we hope one of our readers can supply a species identification.  In colder climates, the ootheca or egg case passes the winter and hatches in the spring.  In milder climates, we would expect the ootheca to take several months to hatch.  You do not need to give the ootheca any special care.  Your photos are very nice.

Unknown Preying Mantis

Preying Mantis

Karl delivers an identification
Hi Daniel:
There are at least two species of tiny mantids in the region, the common European dwarf mantis (Ameles spallanzania) and the much rarer Geomantie larvoides. Both are less than 3 cm in size and both show considerable color variation. However, G. larvoides has round eyes and is completely wingless in both sexes, while A. spallanzania has more typically conical eyes and only the females are flightless, although they do retain small vestigial wings. The wide upturned female abdomen is also notable for A. spallanzania. Therefore, I think this is likely a species of Amelas, quite possibly A. spallanzania. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

2 Responses to Preying Mantis from Greece lays Ootheca: Ameles spallanzania

  1. Geiton says:

    Hi again and thanks for the replay. After hours of searching I found out that this little mantis is identified as Ameles sp.

  2. lttlechkn says:

    Could it be Ameles spallanzania? Found this link for a reference http://tolweb.org/onlinecontributors/app?page=ViewImageData&service=external&sp=31108 .

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