From the yearly archives: "2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

lantern fly?
Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 7:56 PM
I found this weird bug outside by the light on the side of my house in the appalachian foothills of NC. We live out in the country and see some strange bugs/moths, but this is super weird!! Any thoughts?
Sarah
Nebo, NC

Dobsonfly

Dobsonfly

Hi Sarah,
This is a Dobsonfly, and it is one of our most common summer insect ID requests.  It appears that your specimen is a female, though the angle does not allow us to fully view the mandibles.  the mandibles of the male Dobsonfly are much longer and formidable looking, though the female is more inclined to bite.  Though the bite may pinch, it is harmless.  A few days ago we received another image of a Dobsonfly, but have not managed to post it yet.  Perhaps we will hunt for it now.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large 4-inch spider under deck in MD
Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 5:10 PM
Found her under the deck last night in central MD; body about 1-inch; almost 4-inch leg span. Lovely leg striations. Seemed shy. No web. Not hairy like a wolf spider and legs too long and skinny. What is she? Habitat? Have never seen one before. Would prefer she lives outside!!! Released her in our back woods with creek. Fisherman spider?
goodbug
ellicott city, MD

Fishing Spider carrying Egg Sac

Fishing Spider carrying Egg Sac

Dear goodbug,
What a spectacular photo you have provided for us of a female Dolomedes Fishing Spider, probably Dolomedes tenebrosus, carrying her Egg Sac.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Iridescent Goldsmith Beetle?
Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 10:14 AM
We were at a friend’s home in Sauk Rapids, Mn, and our daughters found this shimmering iridescent green beetle. Her daughters found this link, and thought it might be that. Only in a picture that doesn’t show it’s iridescence, did I think it might be a version of this one, but when we saw it in person, it didn’t look gold at all…just the “bejeweled” green! As if it was imbedded with crystals.
The girls names are Madison and Shaelynn Waseka-(Mom is Marla), and Kristina Anderson.
I happened to be there to take pictures of her home/property, so we got the bug too! 🙂
Photographer: Kathy Anderson
Property owner: Marla Waseka-Contact: Design Firm-Graceful Spaces
Later that day, she went to another friend’s house, who had just found a “Goldsmith Beetle” that day, and saved it since she found it dead. How ironic is that?
So it looks like this one is “family” to the Goldsmith-but is there another name for it, because of the green?
Kathy Anderson/Marla Waseka
Sauk Rapids, Mn

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Hi Kathy and Marla,
We believe your ID of the Goldsmith Beetle, Cotalpa lanigera, is correct.  According to BugGuide, the coloration of the Goldsmith Beetle is .  Even more interesting, the greenest example posted to BugGuide was from St. Paul, Dakota County Minnesota.  We actually think your individual is one of the loveliest examples of a Goldsmith Beetle we have seen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Nuttall’s blister beetle and true bugs
Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 6:33 AM
Hi Lisa Anne and Daniel, when I took this photo I was focused on the blister beetle. But I am now intrigued by the true bugs which I am unable to identify. Can you?
Thanks so much.
Dwaine
Pine Mtn, west of Casper, WY

P.S. Nuttall’s
Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 6:58 AM
Sorry, I know better. They are on Golden Banner (Thermopsis rhombifolia).
Dwaine
Pine Mtn

Nuttail's Blister Beetle and unknown Plant Bug

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle and unknown Plant Bug

Hi Dwaine,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo of Nuttail’s Blister Beetle. Lytta nuttalli. We believe the Hemipteran in the photo is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae. We looked through many photos on BugGuide, and we believe your bug most closely matches a posting of the genus Hadronema. Interestingly, there is a photo posted to BugGuide of a Plant Bug in the same subfamily, Orthotylinae, Aoplonema nigrum, that is associated with a Blister Beetle. We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he agrees with our identification. Perhaps the plant bugs gather the blistering agent, cantharidin, as a defense mechanism.

Update: from Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The swamp milkweed beetle ID is right on.  I don’t have the time at the moment to research the plant bug beyond family level, and that is also correct (Miridae).
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth, beetle, & spawn in southern Ontario
Tue, Jun 16, 2009 at 4:44 PM
I have three bugs I’d like identified. All photos were taken today in my backyard (date is on the photos). I live in Hamilton, Ontario (Canada).
… 3)Spawn.jpg – This year almost all dandelion leafs and weeds in my area are covered in this foam with a small yellow slug-like bug in the center! Whenever I go to pick some greens for my Guinea Pigs my hands get covered in the stuff. This is the first year I’ve seen such a thing and they were even present at a park 50km away that I visited last week.
Help in identifying these 3 bugs would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you, Luke.
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Spittlebug

Spittlebug

Hi Luke,
As we have already indicated, multiple unrelated species in the same letter is something we avoid posting, but we were really interested in sharing two of your images with our readership.  This is a nymph of an aptly named Spittlebug in the family Cercopidae a group of free living Hemipterans.   According to BugGuide:  “After the nymph molts for the final time, the resulting adult insect leaves the mass of ‘spittle’ and moves about actively. The ‘spittle’  is derived from a fluid voided from the anus and from a mucilaginous substance excreted by epidermal glands. Spittlebug nymphs wander away from their spittle masses, and either start new ones, or enter those of other nymphs. Aphrophora nymphs hold the record, of one spittle mass over a foot long containing about 100 individuals! (Comment by Andy Hamilton). ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth, beetle, & spawn in southern Ontario
Tue, Jun 16, 2009 at 4:44 PM
I have three bugs I’d like identified. All photos were taken today in my backyard (date is on the photos). I live in Hamilton, Ontario (Canada).
… 2)Beetle.jpg – I found this one on my patio, it also chose not to fly, so I took photos of it then released it. Has orange and black stripes. … Help in identifying these 3 bugs would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you, Luke.
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Swamp Milkweed Beetle

Swamp Milkweed Beetle

Hi Luke,
Posting letters with multiple photos of unrelated species is something we frown upon because of all the extra labor involved and also because of the problems with our archiving and categorization process. Your beetle appears to be a Swamp Milkweed Beetle, Labidomera clivicollis, one of the Leaf Beetles. This is a beetle with much variation in the markings, but one photo on BugGuide looks nearly identical to your specimen. According to BugGuide: “Part of the orange and black milkweed mimicry complex, which inlcudes Monarch butterfly, Red Milkweed Beetle, Milkweed bugs, and at least one assassin bug. Both larvae and adults of this species cut several side-veins of a milkweed leaf prior to feeding, to reduce the sticky latex that would otherwise be produced at their feeding sites. ”
P.S. Your other requests are a Virginia Ctenuchid Moth and Spittlebug.

Update: from Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The swamp milkweed beetle ID is right on.  I don’t have the time at the moment to research the plant bug beyond family level, and that is also correct (Miridae).
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination