From the yearly archives: "2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Alien like Bug
December 31, 2009
I do not know what this is. It is not something I have seen before. It surely resembles to one of those alien creatures in sci–fi films than an earthling.
Appreciate some help to identify this fellow.
Refer below for more info.
http://kirigalpoththa.blogspot.com/2009/11/aliens-in-garden.html
http://picasaweb.google.com/Kirigalpoththa/AliensInTheGarden#
N/A
Colombo, Sri Lanka

Katydid

Katydid

Dear N/A,
Other than believing this to be a Longhorned Orthopteran or Katydid, we cannot provide a species or genus.  We are going to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki who has assisted us in the past in the hopes he can provide more information.

Katydid

Katydid

Response from Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
The insect in the photo is a nymph of Cymatomerini (Pseudophyllinae). The
only genus of this tribe known from Sri Lanka is Sathrophyllia, which of
course does not mean that it cannot be something else (the orthopteran fauna
of Sri Lanka is virtually unknown.)
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

green shiny beetle 30mm +
December 30, 2009
26 December, 17:37h (Height of Summer)
Found on our drive this beetle, ca 30 mm+ long.
Placed it on lawn, but it kept disappearing under grass.
Then – because bricks were very hot – put it on a leaf . It kept running away with incredible speed…
Please identify.
Thanks,
Ingrid
South Africa, Limpopo, Hoedspruit

Dicranorrhina derbyana

Dicranorrhina derbyana

Dear Ingrid,
We didn’t have much luck locating your beetle on the Beetles of Africa website despite believing it to be in the subfamily Cetoniinae known as the Fruit and Flower Chafers, but we did find a matching image in an Ultimate Beetle Collection for sale.  We decided to leaf through the Living Jewels by Poul Beckmann coffee table book our dear friend Monika Bielser from Basel, Switzerland bought us several years ago, and we found a near match in Dicranorrhina derbyana, one of the names mentioned in the list of beetles included in the Ultimate Beetle Collection image.  Doing a web search of that name turned up some near matches on Wikimedia Commons including a nice closeup of a collection and on InsectGeeks.com, but the white markings on the elytra of your specimen are not quite as developed as the images we found either in the book or online, so we can conclude this is either a different species in the genus Dicranorrhina, a subspecies of Dicranorrhina derbyana, or a color variation of the same species.  Also since your specimen is lacking the developed horns, we believe it to be a female.

Dear Daniel
I thank you very much for your swift response and help concerning ID; especially at this time of the year, when your family will want your attention and time!
I wish you all the best for 2010
Greetings from a hot South Africa,
Ingrid Shaul

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thank you and best regards for 2010
Dear Bugman and all at WTB, thank you for the interesting updates over the past years. Wishing everyone the best for the holidays (vested interest to get more interesting updates when everyone is well). Cheers!
Melvin Poon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Bug in Rockhampton, Australia
December 30, 2009
Hi! I just found this picture in my photos from my Australia trip this year, and this bug I just can’t figure out. It can definitely survive in water ( we fished it out of the pool after a few hours and it flew away ), and it must have gotten in there by itself so it can probably swim as well. It has pretty huge claws and makes a lot of noise, and flies and runs pretty fast. I know that a lot of locals didn’t know what it was either, so maybe it’s new to the area or doesn’t come out every year. We saw it in April as far as I can remember, and it started out with just a few and then we started to see them all over. I attached a picture with an australian ten cent coin for size info. I’ve been trying to figure out what it is but I can’t find it anywhere, help would be really appreciated 🙂
Maja Schubert
Rockhampton, Australia

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Hi Maja,
This is a Giant Water Bug.  In the U.S., they are commonly called Toe-Biters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Honey Comb??
December 28, 2009
This structure appears on twigs of Juniperus virginiana and pines, but also on plastic tape of electric cattle fencing. It contains a honey like, but not sweet substance. What insect builds these structures which are 2.5-3.5 cm long.
chrishogger
Scottsville VA

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Hi chrishogger,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis.  Several hundred young should emerge in the spring.  Some years we get numerous letters because Mantis Ootheca are often found on conifers, and they are brought into the home on Christmas Trees.  If unnoticed, the indoor warmth causes the young to emerge early in the house.

Daniel,
Thanks for the identification of the object.
Here are 2 pictures of the adult, which is quite common in our garden.  Which species?

Chinese Mantis

Chinese Mantis

We believe this is a Chinese Mantis, Tenodera aridifolia sinensis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  It is described as:  “Tan to pale green. Forewings tan with green along front margin. Compund eyes chocolate-brown at sunset, pale tan soon after sunrise and during the day.

Chinese Mantis

Chinese Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Winter Critters
December 30, 2009
I took a walk in the woods this month in western New York and found many little critters on top of the snow. I would appreciate any help you might be able to give in identifying. The trails are on a 600-acre wetland preserve and most of the pictures were taken in mixed woods of pine, hemlock, cherry, maple, oak, etc. that surround a very slow-moving marshy pond.
All of the pictures can be found on my blog (which links to bigger versions on Flickr): http://winterwoman.net/2009/12/23/snow-critters/
There were some spiders, too… Can you help with them?
Thanks in advance for your help!
Jennifer Schlick
Wetland preserve, western New York State on Dec 22, 2009

Caddisfly

Caddisfly

Hi again Jennifer,
Your third image is of a Caddisfly, but we don’t want to try to identify it any further than the order Trichoptera, or possibly the Northern Caddisfly family Limnephilidae.  We did find a reference on a fishing website to Winter Caddisflies in the genus Psychoglypha that are called Snow Sedges.
Troutnut.com also has this comment posted:  “Dr. George Roemhild explained to me how he finds these winter caddisflies in February and March: ‘They crawl up on the snowbanks, but when the sun hits their dark wings they melt down out of sight. That’s how I collect them, by walking along looking for holes in the snow.'” We also found a reference to Snow Sedge on the Flyfishing Entomology website, our new favorite etymology reference page.  Your second image, the caterpillar, is some species of Cutworm.

Wow.  You’re my hero.  thanks a billion.  Now I’m going to have to write a blog post about the wonderful folks over at What’s that Bug!!!

Here’s my blog post:
http://winterwoman.net/2009/12/31/whats-that-bug/
Thanks again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination