From the yearly archives: "2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetles Eating My Jamaica Dogwood
August 24, 2009
I was planning on using insecticide to control them ( between these, mealy bugs, and a massive scale infestation I’m getting desperate) but while I was taking these photos a Dingy Purplewing butterfly landed on the tree so I may just have to learn live with them.
Tad
Cutler Bay, FL

Little Leaf Notcher Weevil

Little Leaf Notcher Weevil

Hi Tad,
We are relatively certain that this is a Little Leaf Notcher Weevil, Artipus floridanus.  We did a web search of “white weevil florida and were quickly led to a BugGuide page.

Little Leaf Notcher Weevil

Little Leaf Notcher Weevil

I didn’t realize it was a weevil, I kept looking at leaf beetles.
After a closer look it turns out to be this weevil:
2008/02/23/little-leaf-notcher-weevil-invasive-species-from-sri-lanka/
According to this document ” http://www.doacs.state.fl.us/pi/enpp/ento/entcirc/ent412.pdf ” many of the host plants are in my yard.
Thanks again

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this huge colorful grasshopper?
August 24, 2009
We found these large colorful grasshoppers in the Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park, Texas. But identification stumped everyone we asked. We also saw a smaller, more tan/less colorful version that we did not get a picture of. Possibly the female?
Rebecca, Amelia and Sylvia
Big Bend National Park, Texas

Plains Lubber Grasshopper

Plains Lubber Grasshopper

Dear Rebecca, Amelia and Sylvia,
This beautiful grasshopper is a Plains Lubber Grasshopper, Brachystola magna.  It is also called a Homesteader or Western Lubber Grasshopper according to BugGuide.  BugGuide also indicates it has a :  “Two-year life cycle, with eggs requiring two overwintering periods before hatching.”  Actually, the female is the larger individual in most grasshoppers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

horned caterpiller
August 24, 2009
Hello,
Some friends and I were taking a walk in Hemlock gorge in Maryland and we came across a very strange caterpiller. It was on a chunk of tree bark which was on top of a large rock in a stream.
Jason
Hemlock Gorge Maryland

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Hi Jason,
We always enjoy posting the first Hickory Horned Devil photographs of the season, and your photo is neither the first nor the second we received, but it is the most detailed.  Thanks for sending us this gorgeous Hickory Horned Devil photograph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange blk spotted soft body insect
August 24, 2009
Found on Corn flower plant. Has a soft shiny body
Gary
New York

Potato Beetle Larva

Potato Beetle Larva

Hi Gary,
This is the larva of a Potato Beetle in the genus Leptinotarsa.  BugGuide notes that though the genus is collectively known as Potato Beetles, “but note, not all spp. host on Solanaceous plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of moth is this?
August 24, 2009
We found this moth at a lake in northern Wyoming. It has very feathery antennas. White wings with black spots. Its abdomen is white and black striped, with a fuzzy orange head and thorax. My images are not real clear. Thank you.
Allison
northern Wyoming

Hera Buck Moth

Hera Buck Moth

Hi Allison,
This is some species of Buck Moth in the genus Hemileuca, possibly the Hera Buckmoth, Hemileuca hera.  You can see if the photos posted to BugGuide match your moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Almost artful display
August 24, 2009
Me and my wife were on the way to the hospital to get some metal stitches pulled from me tummy from a hernia surgery, and seeing as we had the nikon tagging along with us in the backpack, decided to go by the fountain situated in front of BLDG 2 at the Bill Hefner VA Hospital in Salisbury, NC. We truly couldn’t have come at a better time as as soon as we arrived there was also a pair of grasshoppers prolonging the species as it were. I almost thought it necessary to recommend a hotel, LOL! I will be probably be adding another post here since I truly don’t know where this other insect I found falls into the category. Several Butterflies (Swallowtails and others) were showing off before us along with the random wood boring bee.
This insect is approximately 9/16″ to 5/8″ in length and was kinda slow in moving selectively extracting pollen, and almost playing dead when we got too close. It has some markings that almost look as if someone had attempted to paint small flowers on each side… Absolutely stunning when you can zoom in. Let me know what this litter bugger is, me and my wife are dying to know!!!
Amateur Photographer, Can you tell?
VA Hospital, Salisbury, NC Next to waterfall

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Amateur Photographer,
This moth is known as an Ailanthus Webworm, but sadly, it only eats the leaves of the Ailanthus, or Tree of Heaven, and it doesn’t do much to remove this scourge from North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination