From the monthly archives: "December 2009"

Dark headed worm-like bug with legs
December 6, 2009
Hello Bugman, I was wondering if you might be able to help me determine what kind of worm or bug this is. I looked through your website but can’t seem to find anything similar to what I’ve found lying on my bathroom and kitchen floor a few times over the last couple weeks. I live in the Southern California city of San Bernardino. The bug is a thin, dark-headed worm like insect with what appears to be four small legs closer to the head of the body. The body is a light tan color, almost transparent-looking. I have found them lying on the floor, usually already dead. We have pine trees, little vegetation, and mostly dirt in our backyard and our next door neighbors have swimming pools. The closest thing I have found on the Internet seems to be the midge fly larvae. Coul d this be it? Thanks for your help!
Volo
San Bernardino, Southern California

Wireworm

Wireworm

Dear Volo,
This is the larva of a Click Beetle, and it is known as a Wireworm.

Fuzzy, slow, brown/white
December 6, 2009
We found this little bug on the wall of our entry way. At first we thought it was a mud-dauber hole but then it was in a different spot the next day. It moves extremely slow.
joe
North Texas

Asp

Asp

Hi Joe,
This is the stinging caterpillar of the Southern Flannel Moth, Megalopyge opercularis, and it is called an Asp.

Three unknowns from Torres del Paine, Chile
December 6, 2009
I’ve looked through the categories I can think of for these three (moths, butterflies and beetles) and don’t see matches nor have I found them online with basic searching. All were photographed in Torres del Paine national park, Chile and were unharmed. …
The beetle was seen twice and this is the better shot. In both, there’s a bright orange/red spot on that one leg. Eggs perhaps? They were about 3/4″ long x 1/4″ wide Jess, Minnesota
Torres del Paine, Chile

Unknown Weevil and Mite

Unknown Weevil and Mite

Hi Jess,
We posted the beetle separately from the butterflies.  This is a Weevil, and the red spot is a Mite.

Three unknowns from Torres del Paine, Chile
December 6, 2009
I’ve looked through the categories I can think of for these three (moths, butterflies and beetles) and don’t see matches nor have I found them online with basic searching. All were photographed in Torres del Paine national park, Chile and were unharmed.
The white moth/butterfly was prolific. The orange one was spotted only twice. Both were about 2″ wide x 1″ tall.
The beetle was seen twice and this is the better shot. In both, there’s a bright orange/red spot on that one leg. Eggs perhaps? They were about 3/4″ long x 1/4″ wide Jess, Minnesota
Torres del Paine, Chile

Unidentified Gossamer Winged Butterfly

White Butterfly

Hi Jess,
Based on the striped antennae, we are quite certain the white butterfly is one of the Gossamer Winged Butterflies in the family Lycaenidae.

Unidentified Gossamer Winged Butterfly

The orange butterfly appears to be one of the Brush Footed Butterflies in the family Nymphalidae.  It might take us hours to properly identify the species.  Perhaps one of our readers has a bit of time and can assist in this matter.  We strongly recommend that you post a comment to your own letter and if a reader posts a comment with an identification, you will receive a notification.

Unknown Brush Footed Butterfly, we think

Fritillary

Update by Karl
Hi Daniel:
The white butterfly is actually a White (family Pieridae: subfamily Pierinae) in the genus Tatochila. There are at least seven species in Chile and reference photos are hard to find. I believe it could be T. theodice, but they all look quite similar and there seems to be some disagreement about the taxonomic placement of some of the species (Tatochila vs. Hypsochila).
The orange butterfly is a type of Fritillary that is probably in the genus Yramea (Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae: Argynnini). Species within this genus look very similar to the old world genus Issoria in which they were formerly placed. Yramea is now considered a separate genus restricted to the high Andes and south temperate region of South America. Again, there are about half a dozen representative species in Chile, but as far as I can tell, the one in Jess’s photo looks most similar to Y. cytheris. Regards.
Karl

Another Update forwarded by Eric Eaton
At a guess the Frtiillary is a yramea. It is very reminiscent of Issoria species which is the European sister genus.
Perhaps someone else can follow from there.
Neil Jones

Another Update forwarded by Eric Eaton
I have at hand ‘The butterflies of Chile’ by Peña & Ugarte (1996). The upper photos are very close to drawings of Hypsochila microdice (Blanchard, 1852) in the book, and the lower photo to drawings of Yramea, possibly Y. cytheris (Drury, 1773) in the book. Greetings,
Diego

Scorpionfly head/Earwig cerci???
December 5, 2009
I am teaching 5th graders some insect basics. In our “catching” class, one of the students caught this insect. This was in the moist dirt outside the school in Anderson, SC, Dec. 4,2009. 18mm, ant.5 or 6 seg., snout-shaped head, thorax 11seg with 6 legs on no. 9 -11, tarsi 3 seg, leathery dorsal surface, pincer (earwig-type) cerci. The head shape and location of legs is confusing.

Unknown Larva

Ground Beetle Larva

Otherwise, it just looks like an earwig. Is this some larval form? Pictures are through a microscope. Help!
Cheryl
Anderson, SC, USA

Unknown Larva

Ground Beetle Larva

Hi Cheryl,
We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton with the identification of this larval form.  We wish you had sent a photo of the entire specimen.  You might also want to consider posting a comment to your own query in the event one of our readers supplies an answer.

Unknown Larva

Ground Beetle Larva

Identification by Eric Eaton
Daniel:
Thanks to the magnificent close-up images of all the important body parts, I can tell conclusively that this is the larva of a ground beetle, family Carabidae.  The two claws on each leg immediately distinguish carabid larvae from very similar rove beetle larvae (family Staphylinidae).  Nice work by the photographer!
Eric

Trachyderes mandibularis??
December 6, 2009
found this beetle at my place in BCS
Joanee
Buena Vista, BCS

Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle

Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle

Hi Joanee,
The Long-Jawed Longhorn Beetle, Trachyderes mandibularis, ranges from Texas, Arizona and California south to Honduras, so it would be found in Baja California Sur where you spotted this specimen.  We believe your identification is correct.  This species is well represented on Bugguide.