From the monthly archives: "November 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Id help needed – pretty bugs!
November 21, 2009
I photographed these bugs on butterfly holiday in the USA in Nov 2006. There were seen at the Westlaco Valley Nature reserve in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas. As I live in England I don’t have any suitable field guides and wondered if someone can Id these for me.
Maris UK
LRGV Texas

Pale Red Bugs Mating

Pale Red Bugs Mating

Hi Maris,
This is a new species for our website, but we quickly identified your mating Pale Red Bugs or Turk’s Cap Bugs, Dysdercus concinnus, on BugGuide.  The Rio Grande Valley in Texas is the northernmost reach of the range of the species which is found in Central America south to Columbia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

ground beetle?
November 20, 2009
I found these 2 handsome beetles while digging in the garden in NE massachusetts in early november; I think they were a couple of inches down. I thought they were dead, and placed them in a container for later ID, and when I came back to them a few hours later, they were climbing all over to get out. So, I photographed them, and released them back into the garden. Are they a male and female, and what are they?
Linda in Mass.
NE massachusetts

Pair of Oil Beetles

Pair of Oil Beetles

Hi Linda,
These are Oil Beetles in the genus Meloe.  Oil Beetles are Blister Beetles and they should be handled with care as they exude a compound that may blister skin.  They do appear to be a pair, with the female being the larger of the two individuals.  These are really great photos.

Pair of Oil Beetles

Pair of Oil Beetles

It is the first of December, and we hadn’t prepared in advance for a Bug of the Month, so we searched through recent postings and arrived at this lovely pair of Oil Beetles that was submitted last week.  Oil Beetles can be found throughout North America, though our sightings from the east are more common.  It may be getting a bit late in the year in New England, but they will still be active in the southern portions of their range.  According to Bugguide, the antennae of the smaller males are modified as this set of photos indicates.  The Oil Beetles release an oily substance that contains cantharidin which can cause blistering in skin, hence the common name of Oil Beetle.  This trait is shared with many other Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae, including the notorious European Spanish Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

November 20, 2009
The following pictures were taken at Kakum National Forest in Ghana on November 19, 2009.  This area is the last remaining rainforest in Ghana.  It is home to between 200,000 to 300,000 species of insects.
AJ

Dead Leaf Butterfly from Ghana

Dead Leaf Butterfly from Ghana

Dear AJ,
This sure looks like one of the Dead Leaf Butterflies in the genus Kallima to us.  The classic Dead Leaf Butterfly is Kallima inachis from Asia, but upon doing some research, we learned there are representatives of the genus in East Aftrica.  The International Wildlife Encyclopedia website indicates:  “Dallima, from a Greek word meaning beautiful, is the generic name of certain butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidae.  … Kallima butterflies are also called leaf or more commonly, dead-leaf butterflies.  They too are colorful, strong fliers, but upon closing their wings they are transformed.  The several species of Kallima range from New Guinea through Southeast Asia and southern Asia to India and Sri Lanka.  Some are found in tropical Africa.   …  In the Kallima butterflies the shape of the wings when closed over the back, together with the colors and pattern of their undersides, give the appearance of a dead leaf.  Man members of the family have ‘tails’ on the rear margins of the wings.  these are short and blunt[tipped.  When a dead-leaf butterfly alights on a twig, the wings fold over the back and form a ‘stalk’ shape.  The tip of the leaf is represented by the pointed, curved tips of the forewings as they lie together.  Between this tip and the bogus leaf stalk runs a dark line, across both borewings and hind wings. which looks exactly like the midrib of a leaf.”  Your other butterflies are in the same family, but we need additional time for identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mite or Tick ?
November 19, 2009
i’ve finished my new Azureus tank a few weeks ago, and i’ve found, several times, during the last few days these bugs crawling around my water feature edges.
some info of whats in the viv:
NO Frogs In The Viv ATM !!!
few broms and some riccia starting to expand on the ground.
water feature of waterfall and a pond ( false bottom ). the substrate is a mix of Baltic peat and coco peat/shreds.
thats about it.
omer hauser
U.S.A

Unknown Mite

Unknown Mite

Hi omer,
We needed to do a bit of research just to understand your questions as you used so many abbreviations and words we did not know.  Now we see you have set up a habitat for Dendrobates azureus, poisonous tree frogs, and that the plants are growing.  This looks like a Mite to us.  Not sure what though.  Mites are not our specialty.  Perhaps an acarologist will write in with an identification.

Hi Daniel,
I’m really really sorry for using words you didnt know ( sometimes, i forget that not to long ago i didnt know these words myself 🙂 ) and you had to spend time on research. My sincere apologies.
Thank you for your reply and if you come across a definite answer in this issue, i’d be more than happy if you let me know. I really want to know the common name and the scientific name of that mite.
Thank you again and have a nice weekend.
Omer Hauser

Hi Omer,
Since we do not keep track of our contributors’ email addresses, the best way for you to get your answer is to provide a comment on your own posting, requesting the identification.  If an acarologist writes in the future, our website program will contact you that a comment has been posted to your comment.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wierd Bug in eastern NC
November 19, 2009
I am trying to figure out what this is. I have only seen one other like it. Up close, it looks like it has a lobsters head, mole paws and the features of a grasshopper. Soo strange. What is it and what does it do/eat?
Dawn
Eastern NC

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Dawn,
This is a Mole Cricket, so your description of the mole paws is quite accurate.  Additionally, Mole Crickets are in the same insect order as Grasshoppers, and since they are both Orthopterans, that observation was also quite keen.  Mole Crickets are subterranean diggers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

November 19, 2009
Small Red Insects hatching from some type of egg line on a stucco post of my house. I’ve seen these same insects on plants in my yard. What are they? Thanks,
Howard Williams
Houston, Texas USA

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Dear Howard,
These are Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings in the family Coreidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  They are also known as  Big Legged Bugs because many species have large hind legs.  Most Leaf Footed Bugs are plant feeders.  There is a photo posted to BugGuide, also from Texas,  that looks very close to your specimens.  The eggs are barely visible in the upper portion of your photo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination