From the monthly archives: "November 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

pair through window
November 26, 2009
A pair of bugs, about 1 cm head to tail each, photographed through a window. mating? southern hemisphere spring (november 26).
Greg
Christchurch, New Zealand (43 S)

Mating March Flies in New Zealand

Mating March Flies in New Zealand

Hi Greg,
These are March Flies in the family Bibionidae.  There is a North American species found in Florida and vicinity that are known as Lovebugs because of the vast quantity that fly about “in flagrante delicto” like your couple.  According to an online article we found written by D. Elmo Hardy:  “The family Bibionidae is poorly represented in the New Zealand fauna; only to genera have been recorded to date.  These are represended by six species of Philia and one species of Bibio.  the Bibio is an Australian species, but the Philia species are endemic and known only from New Zealand.”  It would seem appropriate that the name of the genus Philia has its root in Philotes, the Greek spirit of friendship and affection, or alternately, sexual intercourse.  The Brisbane Insect Website has images of mating March Flies that illustrate the large head of the male and the smaller head of the female, which is also apparent in your photograph.  This genus should not be confused with the biting Horse Flies that are called March Flies in Australia because of their appearance for a short time in March.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What spider is this?
November 25, 2009
I live in Cape Town, South Africa and found this spider walking in my Kitchen last night. Can you tell me what it is and if it’s poisonous?
doesn’t matter
On my wall, in my Kitchen, in Cape Town South Africa

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear doesn’t matter,
This is a Huntsman Spider, probably a female Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has become very wide spread in ports around the world.  All spiders have venom, but this particular species is not considered dangerous to humans.  The Huntsman Spiders are nocturnal hunters that will feed on Cockroaches.  There are South American Huntsman Spiders that are reported to have dangerous bites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Colorful Beetle
November 24, 2009
Spotted this super colorful beetle and I have no idea what it is after looking for more info. Help!
Stingrey
Big Bend National Park

Unknown Jewel Beetle

Unknown Jewel Beetle

Hi again Stingrey,
This beauty is a Metallic Wood Boring Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, but we haven’t the time to scour BugGuide for an exact identification at the moment.  We will contact Eric Eaton for assistance, and perhaps one of our readers will also know the answer.

Immediate Update:
We gave it a shot, and quickly found Drummond’s Blue Footed Bup, Lampetis drummondi, on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Camo Mantis Desert Bug
November 24, 2009
Greetings! I found this lovely little creature in the far western Sonora Desert in the cool of the evening in September. It looked rather like a mantis but moved very quickly across the ground. It was about 3/4 of an inch long. I was lucky to see him at all, I just happened to be looking right there. His camouflage was amazing! And like I said, he was very fast, which does not seem normal for a mantis. Ideas?
bludatta
western Arizona, Sonora Desert

Minor Ground Mantid

Minor Ground Mantid

Dear bludatta,
We believe this is a Ground Mantid in the genus Litaneutria, most like Litaneutria minor which Charles Hogue calls the Minor Ground Mantid.  It is an active species that runs quickly.  BugGuide has additional images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is the bugs name?
November 24, 2009
Hello,
We are a daycare centre for preschoolers in Sydney, and some of our children were very curious as to what this bug was. Perhaps you could help us figure it out! 🙂
SDN Linthorpe Street
Newtown, Sydney NSW

Immature Eucalyptus Tip Bug

Immature Eucalyptus Tip Bug

Dear SDN,
This is an immature Eucalyptus Tip Bug in the genus Amorbus.  We believe it looks closest to Amorbus rhombifer based on photos on the Brisbane Insect Website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Saw this (possible) mating ritual…
November 24, 2009
Although I saw the two bugs interacting for some time, I have no idea what they are after having looked here and there for an answer.
Stingrey
Big Bend National Park

Robber Flies

Robber Flies

Hi Stingrey,
These courting Robber Flies are gorgeous.  The male is flying.  We believe they are in the genus Laphria, but we cannot find an exact match on Bugguide.  The closest is Laphria trux but it has black legs, not red ones like the individuals in your photo.  Last week we got assistance from an expert in Robber Flies, Dr. Robert A. Cannings, Curator of Entomology from the Royal British Columbia Museum.  We are writing to him again for assistance.

Hi Daniel:  I’m sure this is a Heteropogon. There are a number of
species in Texas (and I’m not familiar with them) but this may be H.
patruelis, which is relatively big and has a red abdomen. I’ve sent the
photo to Eric Fisher to see if he can help.
Rob

Update from Robert A. Cannings and Eric Fisher
November 30, 2009
Hi Daniel: Here is Eric Fisher’s reply about the Heteropogon. There’s no one better at identifying most NA asilids, so I doubt if you’ll get a better answer.
Cheers,
Rob

Hi Rob,
Yes, this courting pair do look like Heteropogon patruelis — especially in overall coloration. Only puzzling thing is I can’t really see signs of the patches of erect black & white hairs on the midlegs of the male (I assume the extended legs are the fore pair, and the dangling ones are the midlegs; hard to tell because the leg-base area is so dark).
… Cheers,
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination