From the monthly archives: "November 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

orange butterfly
November 27, 2009
This is also another butterfly specimen I got from my teacher. It’s size is not very big, the wing span is about 6cm. The wing is orange in colour with black line running along it’s wing skeleton.
Kit
Malaysia, tropical rain forest

Orange Albatross

Orange Albatross

Hi Again Kit,
The Butterflies of Malaysia website only had a view of the undersides of the Orange Albatross, Appias nero, so we searched the scientific name and found the Wings in Motion website that indicates that the Orange Albatross is the only species of butterfly in the world that is all orange.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

black and green colour butterfly
November 27, 2009
I got this butterfly specimen from my teacher. It’s wing span is about 8cm.
Kit
Malaysia, tropical rain forest

Blue Triangle

Blue Triangle

Hi Kit,
We quickly located this Common Bluebottle or Blue Triangle, Graphium sarpedon, on a Butterflies of Malaysia websiteWikipedia indicates that there are fifteen subspecies with different distributions throughout South and Southeast Asia and Australia
.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Microscopic bugs in the swimming pool
November 28, 2009
Thousands of tiny insects in the swimming pool. Not on the grass, trees or flowers. Appear after big rains and hot days. Floating on water and very active once scooped out. They jump approx 10cm and they are 1 or 2 mm
Phil
Johannesburg, South Africa

Springtails

Springtails

Hi Phil,
We recently completed a section of our book where we talk about Springtails being the most common insects on the planet, with a worldwide distribution and adapting to varying habitats.  There are several groups of Springtails that will become quite numerous and are fond of living on the surface of the water of swimming pools.  You have Springtails.

Springtails

Springtails

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this a cricket?
November 26, 2009
What type of insect is this. It is about 1 inch long and very slow moving and docile (can hold it in your hand). I see them on the side of my house and found the one in the pictures in my garage (@ 50F !). We originally were affraid they were Asian long horned beetle but obviously they are not. Can you identify?
Paul
eastern Massachusetts

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Paul,
With the onset of winter, the number of identification requests we receive for Western Conifer Seed Bugs increases as they seek shelter indoors to escape the cold.  They are harmless, and they will hibernate through winter, producing a new generation in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

It is a Worm, but looks like he is armour plated
November 27, 2009
Hi Bugman
I wonder if you could help us?
My two boys, Ronin (9) and Raith (7) found this bug in the garden under dry leaves about 3 weeks ago. No one seems to know what it is, but he looks armour plated and yet has a snail like head? My boys have named him Rolanaith ( A mixure of all our names ) AKA Nathan. 🙂
We keep him in a big container inside with lots of dark brown garden sand, moist flowers, green leaves, dry and wet, some grass and ground cover etc .. as to create his home environment and this is changed regulary.
We seem to find him under the flowers most of the time. If you touch him, he also glows, he has two spots on either side of him at the bottom of his body and he glows bright green. HE has become our pet … 🙂 but we dont really know what he is, what he eats, what the correct environment is for him etc. please let me know as soon as possible. We dont want him to die, but after 3 weeks, he is still very much alive .. We look forward to your urgent feedback.
Lance, Angela, Ronin & Raith
Kwazulu Natal, Durban

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Hi Lance, Angele, Ronin and Raith,
This is a Firefly larva, also called a Lightning Bug.  It is a beetle in the family Lampyridae.  Adults fly and flash their lights to signal mates, but the light in the larva is believed to be a defense mechanism to warn predators of the Firefly’s powerful chemical defense that has an unpleasant taste.  It sounds like your environment is fine, but you need to provide food.  According to BugGuide:  “Nocturnal, some live in moist places under debris on the ground, others beneath bark and decaying vegetation.   Food Larvae prey on small animals including snails.
”  Our knowledge of world geography is sometimes lacking, and we needed to look up that Kwazulu Natal, Durban is in South Africa.

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Oh my word, THANK YOU! I cannot tell you how much we appreciate your input. THANK YOU. So does this mean that it will develop into a fire fly? It is so big?

Larvae are often larger than the adults.  This might also be an adult female as the females are often larviform

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

House Bugs
November 25, 2009
We have tens of these bugs in our house. We are not sure about this bug. Can you please provide information about this bug and if it is harmful or not. If so, how can we get rid of them.
Many thanks for your information in advance.
Vj
Geographic Location of Bug    uploading the file

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Vj,
Your response to the Geographic Location of Bug is of no assistance to us since it doesn’t make any sense.  This is an Earwig, though we are quite curious where the photo was taken since it is a species we do not recognize.  The forceps are quite spectacular.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a lot for the quick response.  I have uploaded some more photos of the same into the web site immediately, along with the Geographic location.  We are located in India > Andhra Pradesh (this is the state) > Hyderabad (city) > Miyapur (location).
We have a very big river right behind our house and we see many different types of bugs on a daily basis.  This perticular type of bugs are increasing in numbers.
Since we have a 8 year old son, who is developing some kind of rash now a days, we wanted to elimiate all possible options, including bug bites.
If you want I can send you some more pictures of the same.
Once again many thanks for your information.  I will gather more information on this bug from the web.
Best regards,
Vj.

Karl Comments
November 30, 2009Hi Daniel:
Earwigs are well beyond the fringe of my normal comfort zone, but I will give it a try. I believe the genus is Diplatys (Dermaptera: Pygidicranoidea: Diplatyidae: Diplatyinae) and I think Vj has photographed a nymph. According to an early but exhaustive work by Burr, 1911 (Dermaptera; In: Genera Insectorum) “Larvae [of Diplatys sp.] depressed; instead of forceps, having long segmented caudal styles, resembling antennae; number of segments varying from about fifteen to thirty; segments cylindrical, gradually lengthening after the second, the basal segment equaling in length the next five or six segments. This long basal segment is the sheath of the future forceps.” There are at least six representative species in India but photos and information are very difficult to find. D. lefroyi appears to be a relatively common species that does show a banded pattern and leg markings similar to Vj’s photo. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination