From the monthly archives: "October 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please help ID this insect
October 20, 2009
Monday morning in our Fine Art Gallery I opened up at 8:30 Am and found this brown and tan friend walking across the oriental rug in gallery 3. I moved him outside and he flew away. Tuesday morning comes around and there it is again walking across the same rug.
JB
Connecticut

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi JB,
At this time of year we receive scores of reports of Western Conifer Seed Bugs entering homes to escape the cold.  We are amused that your individual is an art appreciator.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs are harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you help me identify this bug?
October 20, 2009
Found and took a photo of this bug with long legs, wings and a pointy rear end. Can you please identify him for me? Thank you.
Alex Tosh
Presidio, San Francisco, CA

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Alex,
This is a nice detailed image of a Crane Fly.  They are harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

six leg, flying, single fang insect
October 21, 2009
Hi guys, This insect has been hanging around my house for a few days now 10/21/2009. I live in a suburb of Pittsburgh PA. Current temp is 60 ish. The insect was found clinging to a window screen, it also like painted block walls. The body from tail to the tip of the head is 1.5″ long. It seems to have a single “fang” and it does fly (not very gracefully). Can you tell me what it is?
Jim Holman
Munhall PA

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Nevermind
Jim Holman to bugman
October 21, 2009
Sorry I was so quick on the trigger. I just submitted a request to id an insect or BUG in this case. I did find the insect on your site. I wasn’t sure how to search for it but using the word armored did the trick. I’m refering to the wheel bug. You may keep/use the images I sent if you like them.
Jim Holman
Pittsburgh PA

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi Jim,
We are happy to see that you identified your Wheel Bug and sent us a cancellation of the identification request within eleven minutes.  We are posting your letter for two reasons.  First it demonstrates the efficiency of our search engine even without having any knowledge of insects, and we hope our readership makes use of it.  Secondly, your photos are quite good and very illustrative of this large species of Assassin Bug.  This is the only image we have ever received of a Wheel Bug with its wings expanded for flight.  Though Wheel Bugs are not prone to biting humans, they can produce a painful bite with that piercing mouth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

small tick-like insect with pinchers
October 21, 2009
I found it on my bedroom wall on 10/21/09.
Lori
Central Massachusetts

Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion

Hi Lori,
Pseudoscorpions are harmless predators that are found worldwide.  Because of their small size, they are rarely noticed except whey they are discovered inside homes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what IS that?
October 20, 2009
this rather large fellow was on the screen door this morning. Never saw the like before.
Bill & Family
Massachusettes

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Bill & Family,
Every year at this time, we get reports of Western Conifer Seed Bugs, Leptoglossus occidentalis.  They are noticed as they enter homes to hibernate as winter approaches.  This species is native to the Pacific Northwest, but has spread across the continent since the 1970s.  They are harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unknown black butterfly
October 21, 2009
Thank you for the identification of the Red headed meadow katydid! It is appreciated. My father took this photo Somewhere in southern Alabama or Mississippi and I could not find this particular black swallowtail. Could you help us out please?
South Alabama bug guy
South Alabama

Unknown Swallowtail from Alabama

Unknown Swallowtail from Alabama is Common Mormon from butterfly house

Dear South Alabama bug guy,
In attempting to answer your question, we stumbled upon a wonderful website, Butterflies of America, that has Papilio thumbnails, as well as the entire family Papilionidae. We could not locate your specimen, and we can’t help but wonder if your father photographed this Swallowtail at a butterfly habitat, or if it is an exotic escapee from a butterfly habitat.

Hi Daniel:
This looks like a Common Mormon (Papilio polytes). It is an Australasian species, particularly common in Southeast Asia, so I expect that you were correct in assuming it was likely an escapee if it was shot in the wild. It is likely a male; the females are mimics of other swallowtails and tend to be variable and more colorful. Regards.
Karl

It turns out the common mormon was indeed taken in a butterfly house in Columbus GA… It was with other pics that weren’t. I didn’t think to ask because I didn’t know it was an exotic. But thanks for the info. I really love your website!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination