From the monthly archives: "October 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Very Entertained.
October 27, 2009
I know you guys get messages and comments all the time saying how wonderful your site is. But, I just wanted to add one more things to your list of comments. Your site is very entertaining to me. I cought myself staying up til 4 in the morning just looking at all of the different kinds of bugs you guys have posted. I know, I’m a nerd. I am just so creeped out yet intrigued by insects. Especially the spiders. I always see an interesting bug and try to stop and look at it but my husband doesn’t seem as entertained by it as me so I have to move along. Now that I have found your site I can look at bugs for hours on end. I also love it because I am a new mommy and every time I see a new bug in the house or around my newborn, I wonder what dangers it is bringing or if it is beneficial. You he lp those worries go away. Thanks and keep up the great work!
Amber suarez

Thanks for your sweet letter Amber.  We always like getting new fans.  Since we have no plans to disappear from the internet, when your child begins to grow, hopefully you will be able to use us as an educational tool.

How do I become a member?
I’m sure this question has a very obvious answer but how on earth do i become a member to this site? I have looked high n low but only found one place where it says log in but nothing about registering.. Do I have to make a donation to be a member? Thanks again for taking time to reply to my previous babble. 🙂
Amber

Hi Amber,
Our site does not have a membership.  Anyone may write in, but alas, we are unable to post every submission we receive.  We select letters at random, often based on the subject line of the email.  Our services are free to anyone, but again, sending in an identification request is no indication that you will receive a response.  Though we do have a donation option, this is entirely voluntary, and donating to the site is never a guarantee that your letter will be posted.  Since we are such a small operation, we cannot provide unlimited access.  Thanks again for your interest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What Spider is this
October 27, 2009
This spider eated his mate.
mr
Costa Mesa, CA

Orbweavers Mating

Orbweavers Mating

Dear mr,
We are uncertain what species of Orbweaver you have sent our way.  We couldn’t even say for sure if this is an Araneus.  Perhaps one of our readers can tell.  Your photos are amazing.  It isn’t unusual for female spiders to eat their mates.

Orbweaver eats her Mate

Orbweaver eats her Mate

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black/orange “jack o’lantern” beetle
October 26, 2009
We spotted this beetle on our trash toter lid on October 23. He was apparently out for a stroll – did not fly while we watched. His markings are striking – a built-in Halloween costume!
Patrice and Allen Sigmon
High Point, NC

Halloween Bug

Halloween Bug

Dear Patrice and Allen,
Though you did not realize it, you actually correctly identified your insect.  The Florida Predatory Stink Bug, Euthyrhunchus floridanus, is frequently called the Halloween Bug because of its coloration and markings as well as its timely appearance.  It is also the time of the month for us to select a Bug of the Month for November 2009, and we plan to use your letter and photo as a point of departure, and include an image of the startlingly different immature insects as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Web spinning huntsman
October 26, 2009
Web spinning huntsman
We get these around outside and inside our house (Queensland, Australia.) They look like male huntsman spiders, and are more active at night, but they also weave massive webs from time to time (between trees) with a very thick fiber. This one came out of my downpipe this morning and bit my arm, self defence I expect, the bite is not serious, just two red dots. Card is in the photo for scale, its the size of a regular credit card.
Dylan
Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia

Giant Gray Huntsman Spider

Gray Huntsman Spider

Hi Dylan,
We are nearly certain this is a Giant Gray Huntsman Spider,
Holconia immanis, which we initially identified on the Geocities Brisbane Insect Website.  We continued to search for information once we had the scientific name.  A website called the Australian Natural History Safari Website that appears to be run by individuals as opposed to being associated with a scientific organization indicates “The Grey Huntsman does not build a web and is found along the east coast of Australia. They are most active in the summer months and are often encountered in houses, gardens and forested areas. This spider does not bite readily and if it does the pain is mild and local to the bite area.”  A scientific paper written by Klaus Henle from the 1993 Journal of Arachnology that is posted online indicates:  “Both species are typical sit-and-wait foragers.Adult H. immanis seem to have 1-2 preferredambush sites where most individuals were ob-served on many consecutive nights up to a period of 6 months.”   Another Australian Insect website that cites Henle’s observations indicates:  “Habitat  Huntsman spiders are found throughout the east coast of Australia. They do not build webs, and are usually found under bark or ivy or other such sheltered plants. They can also seek shelter inside houses. Diet  Typically Huntsman spiders are described to be sit-and-wait foragers where they ambush their prey, often choosing favourite ambush sites (Henle, 1993).” The Insects of Townsville, Australia website built by Graeme Cocks has wonderful photographs.  Since all the information we have been able to locate indicates that this species does not build webs, your observations are most interesting.  All spiders can spin silk, but Hunting Spiders generally do not build webs as snares.  If you are able to photograph this species with its web, please send us documentation in a followup email.  It is possible that the Grey Huntsman Spider uses a silken line to move from tree to tree, but that it does not build an actual web.

Gray Huntsman Spider

Thanks Daniel.
I will keep an eye out for any webs. It happens rarely enough that I think it may be a mating or nesting thing. I’ve seen one wrap a palm frond in silk to make a kind of hide, then tie off the frond to our garage gutter. If I ever see it again, I will take some photos.
Cheers,
Dylan Tusler.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Lovely Bug
October 26, 2009
These guys show up every year when the figs are ripe (July-Aug). About an inch long and maybe 5/8 thick. They usually mass on one fig and leave it in tatters.
Kenneth Magnone
90066 (West Los Angeles)

Figeaters eating Figs

Figeaters eating Figs

Hi Kenneth,
We are so excited that you have sent us a photo of Figeaters eating Figs.  Figeaters are also known as Green Fruit Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Camel Cricket–alive and kicking!
October 26, 2009
Hi WTB–
My cat was harassing this cool bug as it tried to hide out under our baseboard radiator. (We had a Western Conifer Seed Bug in the same area the other day–I think they come in through the track of the sliding door nearby.) At first I thought it was a regular cricket. When I went to rescue it, I found that it something else entirely. I caught it under a glass, snapped a few pictures, and then tossed it back outside into the cool and rainy evening.
The more I looked at this bug, the cooler it seemed to be. I guess it’s a female based on those three huge prongs on her back end. Such a great and complex face! So many little barbs and stickers! Amazing three-toed feet! She was pretty cooperative with the photo session–she mostly held still, except she groomed her long antennae using her paddle-like facial appendages (are those called palps?).
JJR
Setauket, NY (North Shore of Long Island)

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear JJR,
Since we recently posted an image of dead Camel Crickets caught in a sticky trap, your photo is much more welcomed.  We believe the mouthpart to which you refer is the maxillary palpus or feeler.  Seems she is covered in hair and dust and needs to do a bit of grooming.

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination