From the monthly archives: "September 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Flying Ant or Fly
September 23, 2009
This little guy hangs around my computer and other places on my desk “washing his hands and feet”, “scratching his head” and staring at me all day long. He is not timid of me at all. I can put my finger in front of him and he will walk up onto it. He seems to be content sitting still for long periods of time, then abruptly he will scatter. He is very quick when he wants to be. He didn’t seem to like me taking his picture either. I have also seen him riding inside my truck on the rearview mirror when I go on road trips. What is he and what does he want?
Weirded Out In Florida
Panama City Beach, FL.. Northwest Florida Panhandle

Long Legged Fly

Stilt Legged Fly

Dear Weirded Out,
WE believe this is a species of Long Legged Fly in the family Dolichopodidae, but sadly, we have been unable to find a species match on BugGuide.  Long Legged Flies are predatory species that prey on small insects, so they are beneficial and will not harm you.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
No trouble, but I’m answering from a friend’s computer….The fly is a “stilt-legged fly,” family Micropezidae.  Easy to get them confused with longlegged flies, family Dolichopodidae.
Eric

Update
BugGuide indicates this of Stilt Legged Flies:  “Odd little flies, known for their displaying (?) behavior of walking around and lifting their prominently marked front legs. Abdomen attached to thorax by ‘wasp-waist’. Likely ant or wasp mimics. The posture of the forelegs may imitate ant and/or wasp antennae and provide them with some protection from predators
.”  Also, we believe it looks like it might be Compsobata univitta.

Update:  May 18, 2014
Thanks to a new comment, we know that this is
Grallipeza nebulosa, a Stilt Legged Fly that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Many plumed moth
September 27, 2009
Dear Bugman,
My intention to send you better pictures of the many plumed moth a good week ago fizzled when Josephine the cat ate my photo opportunity. Imagine my joy when I found another moth this evening in the bathroom! It sat very nicely for close-ups both on the cabinet top and the wallpaper border.
The tweezers give a good idea of how tiny that moth is; in the lighter picture, you can see that it is even wearing a little “coronet” to go with the sparkly wings; and the darker picture really brings out the shining copper sprinkles.
While this moth is fascinating to see against a lighted surface, its real beauty doesn’t show that way. I think these pictures might do the gorgeous little thing some justice.
Vera-Iratwo
Northern Minnesota

Many Plumed Moth

Many Plumed Moth

Hi again Vera-Iratwo,
Thanks for thinking of us and sending in your wonderful images of another Many Plumed Moth.

Many Plumed MOth

Many Plumed MOth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Swimming insect?fish?
September 21, 2009
I found hundreds of these swimming in a small man made lake in the backyard of my home in Winnipeg Manitoba, no one can seem to tell me what they are.
I have tried other identifying sites before but never seem to get a reply. They were out swimming around the beginning of summer. They seem to swim by fluttering the green fleshy/gill like stuff on their back. I also noticed that some of them had what looked like long egg sacks running along the top of their backs. Can someone please tell me what these are?
Carly
Winnipeg Manitoba

Fairy Shrimp

Fairy Shrimp

Hi Carly,
First we need to say that we went back through the past week’s mail to try to answer a few additional questions when we stumbled upon your letter.  We are very excited to post your images of Fairy Shrimp, freshwater crustaceans.  Fairy Shrimp often live in ponds that dry up, and their eggs are laid and eventually dry in the mud when the water evaporates.  Then the next spring, the temporary pond fills with water again and the eggs hatch, beginning a new cycle.  We have never seen green Fairy Shrimp, and in a few minutes, we are going to try to research something more specific for you.  In our childhood home of Ohio, we would catch Fairy Shrimp in March and April, so we find your September sighting unusual.  You also didn’t indicate if the lake dries out.  The one site we found in a brief search indicates vernal pools as the typical habitat, and none of the images show green Fairy Shrimp.

Fairy Shrimp

Fairy Shrimp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

September 25, 2009
To answer your queston, quote: “Are we experts yet?” Heck yes! I’m a young teen and aspiring entomologist, and I love everything about bugs! And so, you can imagine my wonder and awe when I found a bug ID Page! Keep up the good work!
Steel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Really neat looking Mosquito – White Striped!
September 26, 2009
You know you are a bug lover when you think a mosquito has beautiful stripes. I know they carry disease, but I had to take one for the team when I saw this guy biting my hand, and decided to take a picture of him.
Once Bitten Twice Shy
Austin, Texas

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Once Bitten Twice Shy,
Thanks so much for sending us an image of an Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus, an invasive species that was introduced to North America in the 1980s from Asia.  According to BugGuide:  “The Asian tiger mosquito is an invasive and aggressive species that was introduced to the United States during the mid-1980s. It was first collected in Texas in 1985, apparently having traveled from Asia in a shipment of used tires. These mosquitoes are vicious biters and have been known to transmit disease.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

previous email
September 25, 2009
I sent an email a little while ago (today) asking about a spider in my yard. My mother has since emailed me this name. When I search your site, I see one similar, but am not sure if it’s the same as the spider I sighted in Oregon yesterday.
“bruennich’s argiope”
I’ll attach my pics again.
Thanks!
Sarah in Oregon
Colton, Oregon

lynx or orbweaver spider?
September 25, 2009
My son, 6, found this spider hanging on one of our porch rails yesterday. We took some pics, but I don’t have a good identification system for spiders. He/she did seem to let out some sort of webbing when the cat knocked him from the step. No worries, this critter escaped safely under the porch! I know you can help us bug-geniuses!
Sarah in Oregon
Colton, Oregon

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Hi Sarah,
Thanks so much for attaching your images a second time.  Your spider is in the same genus as Argiope bruennichi, but it is the native Banded Garden Spider, Argiope trifasciata.  This is a harmless, wide ranging species in North America.  Argiope bruennichi is native to Europe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination