From the monthly archives: "September 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unknown “slug-a-pillar” on blueberry bush
August 31, 2009
Dear bugman,
We found 4 of these critters who have stripped a small blueberry bush of its leaves. Three as you see are orange, black stripe down the middle with a little yellow stripe on the outside of the black. They have fleshy barbs that have bristles on them. No apparent feet. They move by a ripple like a slug and poop like a caterpillar. We were unaware of the underside until we put plastic wrap(with holes)on top of the container and they move across it – but leave no “trail”. The other one is yellow with a middle stripe that isn’t as dark as the orange ones – it looks more brownish red and its underside is orange. The undersides almost appear to suction as they move. We live in the Piedmont of NC, they were found Aug 30th, 2009 a young blueberry plant. What is this critter?
Help appreciated, Donna
Advance, NC

Stinging Rose Caterpillars

Stinging Rose Caterpillars

Dear Donna,
According to BugGuide, the Stinging Rose Caterpillar, Parasa indetermina, feeds on “apple, cottonwood, dogwood, hickory, oak, redbud, sycamore and rose bushes.
”  Thanks to you, we can add blueberry to the list.  As the images on BugGuide show, there is considerable variability in the caterpillar coloration and markings.  Beware, as the name implies, if incorrectly handled, the Stinging Rose Caterpillar can sting.

Stinging Rose Caterpillar

Stinging Rose Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long legged large beauty
August 31, 2009
Visiting a friend on Deer Isle in Maine, I found this creature on her screened in porch. It was late August. Not able to find anything close to it in my Peterson guide. Pretty large – It’s body alone was about 2 1/5 inches long. Any ideas?
Gianna
Deer Isle, Maine

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Dear Gianna,
Your spectacular photograph of the spectacular Giant Eastern Crane Fly, Pedicia albivitta, is a wonderful addition to our site.  According to BugGuide:  “This species is one of the largest [Crane Flies] in northeastern United States and Canada, the other being Tipula abdominalis.”  Since it is the first of the month, there is always a bit of a lag time for our new postings to have images show live.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination