From the monthly archives: "July 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Orange Moth
July 29, 2009
I was sent this photo from a friend in Chico, California. My friend said the moth was about a foot from wing tip to wing tip. I have only found one other photo online, but it has no name to it. I am curious as to what kind of moth this is.
Ann G
Chico, California

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Hi Ann,
This is a Polyphemus Moth.  Charles Hogue indicates in his book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin that the species is native to the Los Angeles area.  BugGuide also has reports from California, but most of our reports come from Eastern North America.  Thanks for sending us this California documentation.  We are also going to copy Bill Oehlke on this as he is compiling comprehensive data on species distribution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Luna moth
July 29, 2009
I found this Luna Moth May 8, 2009 approximately 730 am in Peoria, IL. I thought its colors were brilliant so I am passing it along.
j rox
Peoria, IL

Luna Moth
Luna Moth

Hi j,
We haven’t posted a photo of a Luna Moth recently, and your photo is so lovely, we couldn’t resist posting it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Stag Beetle
July 29, 2009
I was trying to identify this huge beetle that was on my porch June 11th. I found it here and am very greatful. I was scared to walk past it!
Stefanie
Midland NC

Giant Stag Beetle

Giant Stag Beetle

Hi Stefanie,
When we made the Giant Stag Beetle, Lucanus elaphus, our Bug of the Month, we thought we would get several more submissions.  Yours is the only one we received, though we got many images of a close relative, the Reddish Brown Stag Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

green three legged arched caterpillar
July 29, 2009
These things are eating my roses and they seem to want to travel in three’s!!
Elizabeth
West Sussex, UK

Unknown Sawfly Larvae on Roses in UK

Unknown Sawfly Larvae on Roses in UK

Hi Elizabeth,
Though they look like caterpillars, these are actually Sawfly Larvae.  Sawfies are non-stinging relatives of wasps.  The posture of your Sawfly Larvae is very consistent with the Argid Sawflies like the Birch Sawfly, Arge pectoralis, pictured on BugGuide.
We found one photo of the larva of a Rose Sawfly, Arge rosae that was photographed in Spain, but the coloration is different from your specimens, most notably a yellow head versus the black head on your individuals.  We found photos of three additional Sawflies that feed on roses on the University of Minnesota extension website (Roseslug, Endelomyia aethiops, Bristly roseslug, Cladius difformis and curled rose sawfly, Allantus cinctus) but none of them exactly match your specimens either.  Hopefully you will be content with the general identification of Argid Sawfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider in Utah
July 29, 2009
I came across this spider while walking in a desert scrub area near a creek. It was about the size of a quarter or maybe a little smaller if I remember correctly. Any idea what it might be?
Curious about Critters
Cedar City, Utah

Red Spotted Ant Mimic

Red Spotted Ant Mimic

Hi Curious,
Using BugGuide, we believe we have identified your spider as a Red Spotted Ant Mimic, Castianeira descripta.  According to BugGuide:  “Although like most spiders this species is equipped with vemon to subdue its prey, it is not considered harmful to humans.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this critter a Phytocoris varipes?
July 29, 2009
I found this critter on the control weir of a retention pond this morning. The fresh moulted shell was about two inches away from it and looks exactly like the pictures I can find on the Internet of Phytocoris varipes but the large growth between the body and head of the moulted insect are puzzling. I expect this will dissipate as the moult process completes? This insect, whatever it is, is about one inch long.
charlibrown
Elgin, South Carolina

Dragonfly Metamorphosis

Dragonfly Metamorphosis

Hi charlibrown,
You witnessed a Dragonfly metamorphosis.  The aquatic Naiad or larva has crawled out of the water and split its exoskeleton.  The growth you mentioned is actually the head of the adult Dragonfly with its large compound eyes.  Perhaps one of our readers can identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination