From the monthly archives: "June 2009"

love your site
Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 10:08 AM
I have used your website many times and really love to save bugs (and other small critters) from uninformed friends (and sometimes strangers) I found a robber fly today and used your website to identify it. My goal is to get some great pictures of the spiders that live on my back porch and send them in. thank you for your easily found information and helping to save bugs everywhere.
Morgan Hart

Please identify yellow bug with black hairs
Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 1:20 PM
I have looked all over the internet and cannot find a name or description for this bug. I know someone out there knows what it is. This is a small yellow-bodied beetle-like bug with six legs and lots of single straight black hairs all over its back. I found this and several others eating holes in my zucchini leaves. I assume since it is eating holes that it is not a “good” bug to keep around. But I have never seen one of these before. I appreciate any help you can give.
Jessica Moore
Charlotte, NC

Squash Lady Beetle Larva

Squash Lady Beetle Larva

Hi Jessica,
We were certain you had a beetle larva, but we thought it must be a Leaf Beetle Larva.  By searching for squash beetle with a search engine, we quickly identified your Squash Lady Beetle Larva on BugGuide.  Most Lady Beetles are beneficial predators, but the Squash Lady Beetle, Epilachna borealis, is one of the few species that feeds on plants.  According to BugGuide:  “The insect and its spiny larvae eat the leaves of squash, cantaloupe, and other cucurbits. An unusual characteristic of this insect is that it circles the leaf area in which it is going to feed. “

Beetle
Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 2:05 PM
A friend found this in her backyard this morning and I went over to evacuate it. It hisses a little and has an earthy oder to it. What kind of beetle is it?
Thanks!
Carla
Florence, AZ

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Hi Carla,
Your friend’s beetle is a Palo Verde Root Borer, Derobrachus hovorei.  BugGuide has this information to explain the taxonomy change to the scientific name:  “Synonyms and other taxonomic changes This common and widely distributed species has been called “Derobrachus geminatus”, but examination of type specimens revealed that the true geminatus refers to a much less common species we have called “Derobrachus forreri” (Santos-Silva, 2007, Arquivos de Zoologia, 38:1-94). Rules of nomenclature require that the name geminatus be applied to the less common species (with forreri as a synonym), leaving the common species without a name. Derobrachus hovorei is the new name given to this species, which can be distinguished from true D. geminatus (formerly D. forreri) by its more weakly striolate antennae.
Ted MacRae ”  Though the Palo Verde Root Borer is not dangerous to humans, the adult beetle has very strong mandibles for chewing its way out of it pupal chamber in the woody palo verde tree.  Those mandibles can also give a painful pinch if the beetle is carelessly handled.

Palo Verde Root Borer

Palo Verde Root Borer

Red Socks
Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 4:36 PM
I saw this guy on a trail in a forested canyon in the Huachuca Mts., southeast AZ (el. 6000 ft). It’s about 4cm long. This is my first foray into bug ident., so I don’t even know where to start! Thanks for the great site, I’m bookmarking it.
mt
Sierra Vista, AZ

Giant Agave Bug

Giant Agave Bug

Dear mt,
This is a Giant Agave Bug, Acanthocephala thomasi, a Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae.  Red Socks is a very colorful description for this distinctive member of the genus. You may read more about this species on BugGuide.

Black & Orange Insect
Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 7:07 PM
Dear WTB, I received an email from my husband, saying that this insect is dangerous. I’ve always been fascinated by different types of insects, so I believe he may have sent it to me to warn me not to touch it. But he only gave me the photo and nothing else. I want to find proof and more info that this insect is dangerous, instead of being misinformed. Hence, I hope you can help me. I really appreciate it. Thank you.
Stephanie Hong
Singapore

Paederus Rove Beetle

Paederus Rove Beetle

Dear Stephanie,
Your photos represent some species of Rove Beetle in the genus Paederus.  We first became aware of these insects when we received a submission from Africa that called them Creechies.  Paederus Rove Beetles can cause serious contact dermatitus, so in that sense they are dangerous.  Thanks for sending us photos of representatives of the genus from Singapore.  The Dermatology Online Journal has an excellent article on dermatitus caused by Paederus Rove Beetles in Sierra Leone.

Paederus Rove Beetles

Paederus Rove Beetles

USDA – New Pest Advisory Group
Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 5:19 AM
Greetings,
I am a member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s New Pest Advisory Group which assess exotic plant pests that are new or imminent threats to U.S. agriculture or the environment. (For more information, please visit our website:
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/cphst/npag/index.shtml .
A coworker and I recently found your website and we have been very intrigued. We noticed the posting about the Ctenuchid fly and that it may be a new species record in the United States.
We would like to ask for your help. When you receive a potential new pest in the United States, could you send us an email to npag@aphis.usda.gov and let us know? I know it’s a lot to ask and that you are very busy, but we would greatly appreciate it.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Stephanie Dubon
The New Pest Advisory Group
Raleigh, NC
npag@aphis.usda.gov
USDA_Symbol_Color

Hi Stephanie,
We will happily contact you the next time there is a potential new introduction that our readership informs us about.