What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cecropia Moths
Thu, Jun 11, 2009 at 5:36 PM
I found these two in my side yard this evening. I see others have also posted pictures of them. Can you give me more information? Are they more native to the Midwestern states?
Thank you,
Sandy
Lincoln, NE

Mating Cecropia Moths

Mating Cecropia Moths

Hi Sandy,
Though we have received several photos of mating Cecropia Moths, Hyalophora cecropia, in the past, we doubt that any are as gorgeous as yours.  They clearly indicate the egg laden body of the fuller female and the more feathered antennae of the male which allow him to scent out the female’s pheromones.  Yes, Cecropia Moths are native to the midwest as well as eastern states. BugGuide’s Data page does not indicate any submissions from Nebraska, but there are reports from Oklahoma and Texas to the south and the Dakotas to the north.  Nebraska is certainly part of the range, though probably the furthest western portion of the range.  As with most species distribution maps, there tend to be fewer individuals at the edge of a range, so sightings from Nebraska might be rare. BugGuide’s information page has this to say about the range and habitat:  “Range East of the Rocky Mountains, from Nova Scotia south to Florida. (3) overlaps range of Columbia Moth in southern Canada and adjacent northern states
Habitat Attracted to lights and increasingly common in urban and suburban areas ”   The information page on BugGuide also indicates Robin Moth as an alternate name, though this fascinating bit of information is news to us.

Mating Cecropia Moths

Mating Cecropia Moths

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