What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brightly Colored Beetle?
Mon, Jun 8, 2009 at 5:43 PM
This past weekend was warm and sunny, so I decided to hang a comforter out to dry on our back porch railing. Musch to my suprise, later that day I discovered 20 or so bright colored bugs congregating on my comforter! They were crawling around in a small area and would stay very close to one another regardless of my probing and prodding. Later in the day, they dissappered and I’ve not seen them since! What were my mysterious visitors??
Curious, Glen Allen, VA
Glen Allen, VA

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Dear Curious,
We have just returned from a week in Ohio visiting family, and we have volumes of email to address. We plan to just skip around and select subject lines that catch our attention. Since we also have a neglected garden and some Euonymus, Golden Chain Tree and Iris from Mom’s garden to plant , we decided to only post one email to let our readership know that we are back. Your subject line caught our attention. Your photo of Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs, Euthyrhynchus floridanus, will be our only posting until much later. We love your photograph with the strong directional lighting. When Florida Predatory Stink Bugs first hatch, they stick together, but they will eventually become solitary hunters that are quite beneficial in the garden since they feed on caterpillars and beetles. This species is also sometimes known as the Halloween Bug, according to BugGuide, because of the adult black and orange coloration. We can’t help but wonder what the other side of your comforter looks like and if it is a family heirloom.

Wed, Jun 17, 2009 at 8:00 AM
Thanks so much for your response!  I’m glad to hear that these bugs are beneficial, and was facinated learn of their social qualities.  I’ll keep an eye out for these when they ultimately mature to their black and orange adult forms!
That comforter was actually a gift from my Mom some years ago and it has held up for 15 years or so.  Definately not an heirloom, but maybe it will be someday!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *