From the monthly archives: "May 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this??
Tue, May 26, 2009 at 6:55 PM
This is a picture of a bug I saw on my garbage can in southern California. I have never seen this kind of bug before. In person the orange on the bug is a lot more orange than it shows in the picture. It was at least an inch long and 1/2 inch wide, possibly bigger. It is orange, white and blackish. The white and black are verticle stripes and the orange is on its legs and face.
Is it a bity bug? Is it a poisonus bug? Is this the sort of bug that might move into our house and have lots of little funny looking bugs? How do I get rid of this sort of bug?
Amanda G
Southern Califonia

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear Amanda,
Other than munching on some pine tree needles, the Ten Lined June Beetle will not do you nor your home any harm.  It will not bite.  It is not poisonous, and it will not move into your home to procreate.  The grubs live underground and feed on the roots of a variety of plants, but they are never numerous enough to cause damage.  Turn off the porch light at night and you will need not fear attracting Ten Lined June Beetles to your house.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

large insect w/ big chompers in central Texas
Tue, May 26, 2009 at 10:01 PM
Howdy. I live in Austin, TX, but my family has a weekend house near the west Texas town of Llano. We were there this past weekend and found this big guy on the screen door to the kitchen. These photos don’t give a sense of scale, but the thing was about 3 1/2 inches from the tip of the jaws to the end of the wings. I couldn’t tell whether it had one set of wings or two. We didn’t bother the bug, and it didn’t bother us, but its big jaws looked respectable. Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Randall
Llano county, west Texas

Dobsonfly

Dobsonfly

Hello Randall,
This is a female Dobsonfly.  Just yesterday we posted a photo of a Hellgrammite, the larva of a Dobsonfly.  The male Dobsonfly has even more impressive mandibles, but it is the female that is capable of delivering a painful nip.  Though the bite of a female Dobsonfly can pinch, she is basically harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big eyed bug in PA
Tue, May 26, 2009 at 8:50 AM
What’s this bug? Thanks!
Mark
Northern PA, US

Mayfly

Mayfly

Hi Mark,
This is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  We haven’t the skill to take the taxonomy beyond the level of order.  We absolutely love the perspective on your photograph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big, Black, Shiny Bug
Tue, May 26, 2009 at 10:11 AM
We saw a number of these bugs by a river on the CT/MA border after a rainstorm in late May. They didn’t hesitate at puddles, but swam straight across and walked out on the other side. They were about 3 1/2 inches long, black, shiny, and had spines. They didn’t seem to be aggressive. What are they?
Sandi
Massachusetts

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Hi Sandi,
This is a Hellgrammite, the larval form of the fierce looking but harmless Dobsonfly. Hellgrammites are considered to be one of the choicest baits by many fishermen. We just recently posted another photo of a Hellgrammite in its subterranean burrow.

Ha!  We thought they had a Dobsonfly like shape!  Thank you!  Our curiosity is satisfied…until next time!
blessings!!!  Sandi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

English Beetle in Cumbria
Tue, May 26, 2009 at 12:49 AM
Hello Bug Expert,
We found this beetle on a fell top here in Cumbria (the English Lake District) on a summers day. There were two of these in a small field vole corpse and when disturbed they made a peculiar hissing noise that seems to emanate from their wings? They are quick burrowers and quite hard to photograph very well. Can you identify it please?
Stephen Lainson
Great Stickle, Cumbria, English Lake District

Sexton Beetle

Sexton Beetle

Dear Stephen,
This is a Sexton Beetle or Burying Beetle.  It is probably in the genus Nicrophorus like similar beetles in North America.  We haven’t the time right now to try to identify the exact species.  The pair were burying the vole corpse where they will lay their eggs.  A pair of Burying Beetles can bury a small corpse in a very short period of time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Interesting Antennae
Mon, May 25, 2009 at 2:04 PM
Hello, Bugman,
A long time ago I spotted this interesting insect in my laundry room. It is dark brown, with black wings, thin, has a relatively small head and, maybe most importantly, has curled, feathery antennae. It is approximately 1.5 to 2 centimeters long. The bug was found in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in January (summer). The weather was quite hot on that night (about 30° Celsius).
Thanks in advance! Keep up with the great site!
Ricardo
Sao Paulo, Brazil

possibly Glowworm

possibly Glowworm

Hi Ricardo,
Often with exotica, we are totally clueless as to identity. That said, we believe this is a beetle, possibly a male Glowworm in the family Phengodidae, or maybe a Fire Colored Beetle in the family Pyrochroidae. We would favor a Glowworm. Hopefully, a reader will be able to assist in a more accurate identification.

possibly Glowworm

Update: A Differing Opinion
Hi Daniel:
Since the antennal appendages are lined up along one side only (bilaterally asymmetrical), I think this guy might be in the family Rhipiceridae (=Rhipiceratidae). It is difficult to find much useful information or photos for this relatively obscure group, but I believe it may be a species of the genus Rhipicera (=Rhipidocera) which occurs in Brazil (31_rhipiceratidae) and Australia . In Australia they are called feather-horn beetles. Another candidate genus could be Callirhipis (=Callirrhipis), another Old and New World genus. As you may have gathered, the taxonomy for this group is rather confusing. There is agreement that both of the above genera belong to the Suborder Polyphaga, along with the North and South American genus Sandalus, but there is little agreement regarding their placement in the same family, or even superfamily. Most “Rhipicerid” larvae are parasites on cicada larvae; the Bugguide refers to the Rhipiceridae as cicada parasite beetles (alternatively cedar beetles). Or I could be on the wrong track altogether. Regards.
Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination