From the monthly archives: "April 2009"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown Elfin b’fly
Fri, Apr 24, 2009 at 3:05 PM
Hi Lisa Anne and Daniel. I noticed you haven’t a Brown Elfin butterfly on your site. Here is one on juniper that I found in central WY on 4/21.
Peace,
Dwaine
near Casper, WY

Brown Elfin

Brown Elfin

Hi Dwaine,
We are going to trust your identification that this is a Brown Elfin, Callophrys augustinus, because there are many species in the genus and proper identification might tax our questionable taxonomic skills well beyond the level we feel comfortable.  According to BugGuide it is:  “locally common; the most often encountered elfin in most of its range.”   Elfins are grouped together with the Blues, Coppers and Hairstreaks as the Gossamer Winged Butterflies in the family Lycaenidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

small, rust-colored but with black stripes/markings around tail
Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 3:32 PM
I was outside and a small (maybe 1/2″) bug flew into my shirt. It may have bitten me, but I’m not sure. It’s rust-colored with some black stripes or markings around its tail. It has wings. I’ve attached a photo of it. I’ve never seen a bug like this before. Could it be poisonous? Do you think it could have bitten me? Thanks for any help you can provide.
Anne
Nashville, TN

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

Hi Anne,
We are always amused at the number of people who write to us wanting “buts” identified.  This is one of the most commonly encountered species of Checkered Beetles, Enoclerus nigripes.  It is entirely possible that it bit you, but Checkered Beetles do not bite people except when threatened.  They are not poisonous.  BugGuide has numerous nice images of this species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mottled yellow beetle, 1″ long with rounded body about the size of a nickle.
Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 11:01 AM
This bug was moving very quickly across our cement patio to our bermuda grass lawn about 8:30 am, April 23, 2009. It has a very round back and head. It is mottled black with yellow, head is solid yellow; underbelly is shiny black. It appeared to be climbing stalks of grass, possibly nibbling on the ends; it tumbled off the stalks often, moving on to other pieces of grass. It moved almost too quickly to get a clear photo.
Julia
Lake Havasu City, Arizona

Inflated Beetle

Inflated Beetle

Hi Julia,
This is a Desert Spider Beetle or Inflated Beetle, Cysteodemus armatus, one of the Blister Beetles.  According to BugGuide, it is found in Arizona, Nevada and California.  Spring is the time of year we get the most Blister Beetle reports, and a relative, the Master Blister Beetle, is our Bug of the Month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some Type of Swallowtail Maybe??
Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 11:13 AM
This pretty butterfly was resting on damp fur this morning and it was such a pretty shade of mint green I had to grab the camera. It had extensions on the tail similar to yellow swallowtails (we have a bunch of those right now) but he/she was much prettier. It would not spread its wings very much for me but it did have red markings near the abdomen on the wings. I live in Eastern Tennessee and today is a nice warm, sunny day. Many butterflies are fluttering about. Anyway, I’d like to know what this little guy/gal is.
Pam Balog
eastern tennessee

Zebra Swallowtail

Zebra Swallowtail

Hi Pam,
What beautiful photos of a Zebra Swallowtail, Eurytides marcellus, puddling. Male Zebra Swallowtails take fluids from wet sand and it is believed that they need necessary minerals and electrolytes, and this is a convenient way for them to imbibe them.

Zebra Swallowtail

Zebra Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Moth with red dot.
Wed, Apr 22, 2009 at 3:23 PM
I’m going to guess it was about three inches long. It was about eight at night when I heard some fluttering, which, by the way, was really loud. At first, I thought it was a big bee. After awhile of it being a Kamikaze, smacking itself in the window, it just kind of sat still, tired or giving up. And I moved into bombard it with pictures.
Rachel
San Jose, California

White Lined Sphinx

White Lined Sphinx

Hi Rachel,
Your moth is a somewhat battered While Lined Sphinx, Hyles lineata. The red dot on the thorax has been caused by the scales wearing off the body, revealing the hard chitinous exoskeleton beneath. The White Lined Sphinx seems to be experiencing quite a population explosion this year, with numerous individuals being reported. We received one letter from the La Jolla, CA area reporting hundreds of White Lined Sphinx flying at dusk.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Boring Beetle? – Turkey
Tue, Apr 21, 2009 at 11:39 AM
We saw these flying rather loudly around willow trees near a stream north of Gaziantep, Turkey. They were quite active and a bit skittish but once I caught one it calmed down long enough for me to get a photo. It’s about an inch and a half long or a little more.
kipouros
Gaziantep/Araban Prefecture/Turkey

Mediterranean Flathead Woodborer

Mediterranean Flathead Woodborer

Dear kipouros,
Many years ago we identified a very similar Buprestid, or Metallic Wood Boring Beetle from Italy.  We believe it is the same species, Capnodis tenebrionis which goes by the common name Mediterranean Flathead Woodborer. The adults feed on the leaves of apricot trees, almond trees and other stone fruits. The larvae bore into the roots and cause great damage.  We located a fine website with information and photos.

Ed. Note Correction: December 31, 2010
Two different readers have provided a correction for us, identifying this Borer as a different member in the same genus:
Capnodis cariosa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination