From the yearly archives: "2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spotted Beetle (?)
Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 8:22 PM
We found two of these fellows crawling on the inside of a lampshade. I’ve only seen one once before, in a bathroom in Northland, New Zealand. Both sightings were in houses with plenty of moderately untended garden, so they may have wandered in from there… any help identifying would be much appreciated.
David
Auckland, New Zealand

Unknown Soldier Beetle

Unknown Soldier Beetle

Hi David,
We believe this is a Soldier Beetle in the family Cantharidae, but we cannot find a matching specimen on the Brisbane Insect web site. Perhaps one of our readers can provide a species specific identification for this distinctive beetle.

Correction
Nice image of what I’m thinking might be some kind of “false blister beetle” in the family Oedemeridae. I’m sending a query to my entomology listserv to see if anyone can confirm my suspicion of Oedemeridae, and perhaps give a genus and species….
Eric Eaton

Confirmation
Eric is right, it is an Oedemeridae. It the Spotted lax beetle, Parisopalpus nigronotatus, found in Australia and NZ.
Diane.

Thanks Diane and Eric,
Though we wanted to try to link to other online postings of this species, we only found one listing on the New Zealand Landcare Research web site without images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Sydney, Australia – Longicorn?
Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 8:53 PM
I thought that perhaps this is a type of longicorn beetle but I haven’t been able to find a description of a longicorn with similar antennae. This was found in December (our summer) in the Sydney suburb of Lane Cove. The body length is around 20mm. I’m interested to hear what you think I’ve found.
Paul
Lane Cove, Sydney, Australia

Longicorn Beetle

Longicorn Beetle

Hi Paul,
We agree that this is some species of Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, possibly in the subfamily Prioninae. We would think a specimen this spectacular and distinctive would be easy to identify, but an identification is proving to be elusive for us. We found a new Australian website known as Insectographs, but could not find your beetle on it. We searched through all the Cerambycids on the Csiro Entomology page and the only one that looks close is the Feather-Horned Yellow Box Borer, Distichocera macleayi, but it is a mounted specimen. This may be a related species in the same genus, and we would not rule out the possibility that this is an introduced exotic specimen. We don’t feel confident with the Feather-Horned Yellow Box Borer identification unless someone else can write in to substantiate.

Longicorn Beetle

Longicorn Beetle

Daniel:
I lucked out just doing some calculated surfing:-) The beetle is Piesarthrius marginellus, indeed a longhorned beetle native to Australia. Neat insect!
Eric Eaton

Thanks Eric,
With the information you provided, we found the Feather-Horned Longicorn on a different Csiro Website than the one we originally searched as well as on the Up Close and Spineless website.

I meant to include the link I found:
http://www.cerambycoidea.com/foto.asp?Id=830
Sorry ’bout that!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grasshopper/Locust From Madagasar
Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 10:41 AM
Hi bugman, in November 2007 i went into the mountains of madagascar and saw many strange insects, the only insect that i couldnt identify was a large colourful Grasshopper/locust looking thing, it was about 10cm long with big red butterfly like wings. I have seen a similar photo on your website and was wondering whether you have managed to positively identify this amazing creature?
Cheers Doug.
Mountains of Madagascar

Rainbow Bush Locust

Rainbow Bush Locust

Hi Doug,
This is a toxic species of grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, known commonly as a Gaudy Grasshopper.  We posted a nearly identical specimen in January 2006 and it was identified as Phymateus saxosus with common names Rainbow Bush Locust, Rainbow Milkweed Locust, or Giant Milkweek Locust.   The toxicity comes from eating milkweed.  Thanks for sending us your gorgeous photo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

ant head and torso, large beetle type body?
Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 8:21 AM
Found a large black bug last night. Has an ant head and torsoe and a beetle type body. It’s about 1 and 1/4 inches long.
Bill
Spring Hill, TN

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Bill,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus Meloe, commonly called an Oil Beetle because of the substance cantharidin that is secreted from the leg joints.  The genus, represented by 22 difficult to distinguish species, is found throughout North America according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth
Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 10:00 AM
I took this pic of this tolype in Sept 08 at French Creek State Park in Eastern Pa. The moth did not move for atleast 36 hours. I just thought it was a good picture to share.
Andy F.
French Creek State Park, Berks County P

Tolype

Tolype

Hi Andy,
This is a Lappet Moth in the genus Tolype, probably Tolype velleda knows as the Large Tolype.  There is a very similar looking species called the Small Tolype, Tolype notialis.  Though we suspect that this is the Large Tolype, it may in fact be the Small Tolype or even another member of the genus.  The genus name, according to BugGuide, means “a ball of wool or yarn, lump.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Painful small flying insect sting
Fri, Dec 26, 2008 at 10:54 AM
My wife was taking a bag outside when she felt a sting on her finger. She had to physically remove the bug off her finger. She indicated that the sting was quite painful like a wasp. It never tried to fly off and we were able to easily capture it. We didn’t see a stinger in her finger but it did leave a small hole and with a white circle around the sting area. We tried looking through your site and thought it seemed similar to a scorpion fly but it seems those don’t sting. Hopefully you can identify it. Thanks !
BLW
Central Texas

Zelus Assassin Bug

Zelus Assassin Bug

Hi BLW,
This is an Assassin Bug in the genus Zelus.  We have difficulty providing identifications to the species level in this genus except for a few distinctive species.  We frequently get reports of Zelus Assassin Bugs biting people.  They do not bite people for food and there must be some other reason for the bit occurring, like a reaction to some physical contact.  Our reports are that the bite is quite painful, but that there is no lasting negative effect.  You can try searching BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination