From the monthly archives: "November 2008"

black bug, white spots, red butt,
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 1:50 PM
I found this bug in the parking lot at work. I have never seen it before and it seemed odd because it is currently around 45 or so degrees in Savannah right now and not the type of weather to see relatively large insects like this one.
CPJ
Savannah, Georgia

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Hi CPJ,
This is a Polka Dot Wasp Moth, Syntomeida epilais, and its caterpillars feed on the leaves of oleander, so it is also called the Oleander Moth. BugGuide has no reports from Georgia, but it does have reports from South Carolina and Florida, and since Georgia is in the middle, one can assume that the moth’s range includes Georgia.  The Polka Dot Wasp Moth is also reported from Texas.

Papua New Guinea, saturnid moth
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 6:17 AM
Papua New Guinea, saturnid moth
We were on a diving trip in Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea and some great moths appeared on the boat every night. We missed getting a photo of the big saturnid moth with long tails, but we did get a good photo of this yellow moth. It was quite common in that area of Milne Bay. Any idea what it is?
Thanks
Bruce Carlson
Papua New Guinea, Milne Bay

Syntherata janetta from New Guinea

Syntherata janetta from New Guinea

Hi Bruce,
We identified your moth as Syntherata janetta on the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site which is membership only and run by Bill Oehlke. It is also found in Australia, and you may read about it on OzAnimals website where it is called an Emperor Moth. There are several color variations and the caterpillars feed on the leaves from a variety of trees, including citrus and guava.

Thanks!  If you’re ever in Atlanta, look me up.  I’ll show you around the Georgia Aquarium.
Bruce

Pre Historic Roach?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 6:31 PM
This bug was found by my father in the laundry. We don’t have trees and bushes, nor earth in our house, but my neighbor has. Hmm.. this is all i know =[
Hope you can tell us what’s this bug! It really impressed us. Thanks
Reinaldo Hartmann
Brazil – Porto Velho – Ro

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Hi Reinaldo,
This is actually a Giant Water Bug.  In the U.S., they are commonly called Toe-Biters since they have been known to bite people who swim in lakes and ponds.  They don’t aggressively bite humans, but they can deliver a very painful bite if carelessly handled.  Giant Water Bugs can fly quite well, and they are attracted to lights, hence the other common name Electric Light Bug.  Perhaps there was a light in the laundry room that attracted this specimen.

Can you identify this tropical cricket?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 12:41 PM
The cricket shown in the photo about is about 7 cm long. The distinctive features of this insect include the turqoise eyes and the long antennae. The specimen shown had just been disabled after being struck by a shoe. My young children cowered in fear after it alighted on a balcony ledge.
Solar
Saint Lucia, West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Hi Solar,
We are more inclined to think this is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae as opposed to a Cricket in the family Gryllidae. To be safe, we would only classify down to the suborder Ensifera, the Long-horned Orthoptera until we get some input. We would think that this is a well documented species due to its unusual eye coloration which almost seems to have been enhanced through PhotoShop, but we didn’t have much luck with our web search.

Update:  April 21, 2021
Thanks to a new submission, we now know that this is a Forest Katydid,
Nesonotus tricornis, which is pictured on Nature Picture Library (where Piotr Naskrecki provided the image).

Someone sent me this pic from Botswana
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 2:26 PM
Dear bugman:
I don’t have much to go on here. All I know is the photo is from Botswana. Not even sure what part of the country. Thanks in advance.
Alex
Botswana

Shield-Back Katydid from Botswana

Shield-Back Katydid from Botswana

Hi Alex,
This is a Shield-Backed Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae. Other than that, we would need the input of someone familiar with the species in Botswana. Some Shield-Backed Katydids are carnivorous, but most are plant eaters.

BTW, I love your site. You guys are what the web is supposed to be.

What is this bug?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 11:18 AM
Hi, I have lived in CA 25 years anf have never seen this before, what is it?
Roger Turney
Dana Point CA

Brochymena

Brochymena

Hi Roger,
This is a Predatory Stink Bug known as a Brochymena.  You can find additional information on BugGuide, which states:  “Predatory on other insects, especially caterpillars. May feed some on juices of leaves as well” and that it is generally found in “Spring, fall (adults overwinter, so adults typically absent in mid-summer) .”  Since adults hibernate, they may enter homes in the fall.