From the monthly archives: "November 2008"

Black & white spotted poka dot cockroach
Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 9:31 PM
Hi there I was just wondering what this bug is I was working in the Pilbara, In Western Australia it is about the size of a cockroach.
Felicity Packer
Tom Price Western Australia

Acacia Longicorn

Acacia Longicorn

Hi Felicity,
This is not a cockroach, but a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  Your photo is extremely blurry, but we believe, based on the markings, that this may be an Acacia Longicorn, Penthea vermicularia which we located on the Geocities website of Brisbane Insects.

Yellow fiddler beetle, Victoria, Australia
Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 9:28 PM
I saw a very brightly coloured bug on my back step, and after going through your Australian bugs, I found it was a fiddler beetle. I thought it would be a good addition to your photo collection as it is bright yellow, where all the photos you have they are green. Unfortunately this is the only decent shot I managed to get.
Anthony ‘Timorg’ Cassidy
Victoria, Australia

Fiddler Beetle

Fiddler Beetle

Hi Anthony,
We know that winter is upon us in Los Angeles when the Fiddler Beetle photos from Australia start to arrive in our email inbox.  Sure enough, your letter arrived just as our first major rain storm of the season fell.

Found under my floor.
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 3:38 PM
Hi,
I am busy doing some house renovations and on lifting some of my floor boards I found about 2-3 dozen of these critters standing on the under side of the floor boards. They seem reasonably inactive, most of them are just stood there, 1 or 2 are flying around. Since then I have also spotted 2-3 flying round in the rooms of the house. The conditions under the floor boards are cold and damp, bare soil is present.
I am on the North East coast of the UK, and it is a fairly wet and cold mid November at the minute.
The reason for wanting to know what they are is mild concern that they may be the adult form of something detrimental to wood.
Overall length of the body is around 9-10mm, as scale isn’t clear in the pics.
Cheers, Cam.
North East UK

Mosquito from UK

Mosquito from UK

Hi Cam,
These sure look like Mosquitoes to us, but we can’t figure out what they are doing under the floor boards. Perhaps there is a stagnant water source nearby where they are developing. Perhaps one of our readers can share some insight. The Mosquitoes won’t harm your floor, but the females may bite you and your family and tropical species especially are important disease vectors.

Mosquito from UK

Mosquito from UK

Hi, Daniel:
Wow, you have been very busy posting!  I turn my back for a week and….wham!  LOL!
Ok, the mosquitoes may be overwintering as adults, don’t know.  Just contact someone locally in L.A. in vector control at the public health department for a better explanation.  Mosquitoes I don’t know that much about, honestly….
Eric

Correction Courtesy of Angel van Gulik:  January 17, 2017
This one is most likely a Culex pipiens.  The shape and coloration of the abdomen, along with indoor overwintering behavior is typical of that species, and it is the most common mosquito found in England.  I can’t ID to 100% certainty only because I would have to view the white “stripes” on the abdomen very closely to see whether they come to a pinch along the edge or not to rule out Culex salinarious.

Tailless Whipscorpion British Virgin Islands
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 10:16 AM
This Tailless Whipscorpion photo was taken in Tortola, British Virgin Islands, about 10pm on Feb 3 2008. It had been moving back and forth to alternate sides of the wood door as I tried to see it better using a flashlight, and it seems to have gotten used to me as it allowed my hand to get pretty close. The flash must have scared it away because it took off when the photo was taken – they can move really fast! Is that a single eye in the middle of its front top? That seems an unusual place for an eye. (BTW I think it is only fair to make a donation when submitting a photo or question, so I made a PayPal contribution to you, watch for confirmation # 9 edited for privacy)
RD
North side of Tortola, British Virgin Islands

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Hi RD,
We were very happy to receive your letter since the last Tailless Whipscorpion submission we received was asphyxiated with insecticide.  Tailless Whipscorpions can scuttle sideways in a crablike fashion very quickly.  According to BugGuide, Tailless Whipscorpions have eight eyes.  You can also find some interesting information on the About Everything website.  Thanks for your kind contribution.

Possibly a Grasshopper ?
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 7:49 AM
This group of several dozen bugs was seen early afternoon. They would move a few centimetres then stop (all on top of each other) and then move again in unison. We inotially thought they were on top of and eating something but this was not the case as when they moved there was no trace of anything where they had been.
Peter St Clair
St Lucia Wetlands Park, South Africa

Grasshopper Herd in South Africa

Grasshopper Herd in South Africa

Hi Peter,
These are immature Grasshoppers or Nymphs. We are not certain of the species however. They resemble North American Lubber Grasshoppers in the family Romaleidae. We especially like your vivid description of the “herd’s” method of locomotion.

Immature Grasshoppers in South Africa

Immature Grasshoppers in South Africa

Hi, Daniel:
Wow, you have been very busy posting!  I turn my back for a week and….wham!  LOL!
The “grasshopper herd” are nymphs of something in the Pyrgomorphidae most likely, being that colorful and all.
Eric

desperately seeking damselfly
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 8:50 PM
Hello again Bugman. I realize that damselflies are murder but can you help us get close on this one? This is another shot from Sam,11, taken near a pond by our house. Is this some variation of female Eastern Forktail? Hope you have a great Thanksgiving. We give thanks, among other things, that you are here! Jimmy
Sam and Daddy Jim
Pond, wetlands, 35 miles west of Chicago

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Hi Sam and Daddy Jim,
Male Damselflies are difficult enough for us to distinguish from one another, but the drabber females are really a challenge.  We hope that by posting your image, a reader can comment.  A female Eastern Forktail, Ischnura verticalis, seems like a very good bet based on imagery posted to BugGuide.