From the monthly archives: "November 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating Beetles / Northern Michigan
Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 9:15 AM
These beetles were all over a small meadow next to our cottage in Maple City Michigan during the first week of August, 2008. Caught these two mating. Ooh la la… I have no idea what kind they are and haven’t been able to ID them on my own.
Your site is wonderful! Thanks!
Jeff
Maple City Michigan, USA

Mating Banded Longhorns

Mating Banded Longhorns

Hi Jeff,
Your mating beetles are Banded Longhorns, Typocerus velutinus, in the group known as Flower Longhorns.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on decaying hardwoods such as oak, hickory. Adults usually found in daytime, but do come to lights, so probably somewhat nocturnal. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Humped-back beetle
Sat, Nov 1, 2008 at 1:12 PM
I’ve spent months trying to figure this one out. It was seen in a suburban backyard garden. This l’il critter is so unique. Besides the hump, the textured posterior and color pattern are particularly attractive. I would be very grateful for any hints as to the identity of my mystery beetle (no rush). You folks are great – I love the site.
WayneO
Brunswick, Frederick County, Maryland

Bark Beetle

Bark Beetle

Hi Wayne,
We believe this is a Bark Beetle in the tribe Scolytini which may be viewed on BugGuide. The elytra or wing covers resemble the genus Ips, but there seem to be structural differences, including the antennae. We will check with Eric Eaton to get confirmation.

Yes, I do have an opinion on the “bark beetle.” It is actually a specimen of the red-shouldered bostricthid, Xylobiops basilaris. Bostrichidae are often mistaken for bark beetles, so you are in good company.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Yellow-Green Crawler with mouse teeth
Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 3:25 PM
I found this crawling down our driveway this morning and the kids and I want to know what it is? We live in North Texas and have some Live Oak trees.
Always Wondering
Dallas, TX area

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Polyphemus Caterpillar

Dear Always,
This is a Polyphemus Moth Caterpillar, Antheraea polyphemus, and you may find information on the caterpillar and moth by visiting BugGuide. Giant Silkworm Caterpillars like this are often noticed when they leave trees and search for places to pupate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two fuzzy caterpillars
Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 9:56 AM
I found this caterpillar on the ground underneath my oak tree. His white fuzz had caught the afternoon sunlight causing him to almost glow! He was making his way across my driveway towards the trunk of said oak tree. I snapped a bunch of pictures hoping to ID him online, but I cant find anything that looks like him. I stuck him on the tree just in case that was his destination (my roommates kill bugs!). And since I just referred to it as a he throughout, can you tell me if caterpillars have genders? The second was found on a weed very near the first one. It looks like a tussock moth caterpillar but I cant find an exact match. Love your site, and thanks in advance!
Dana
Athens, Georgia

Laugher

Laugher

Hi Dana,
Your white caterpillar with the markings on its head is known as the Laugher, Charadra deridens.  You may read about it and see a photo on the Caterpillars of the Eastern Forests website.  We believe your Tussock Moth Caterpillar is in the genus Dasychira based on images posted to BugGuide.

Tussock Caterpillar

Tussock Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tiny pale green spider on forest floor…
Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 9:27 AM
I was examining a scrape on the forest floor, looking for hair when I found this tiny little spider! It coudnt be bigger than a centimeter across the longest point (wish I had had a coin with me for size reference). It walked sideways like a crab. When disturbed it pulled its legs in and tried to look inconspicuous. After I got done taking pictures it crawled to the underside of a leaf and hid.
Dana
Athens, Georgia

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Hi Dana,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.  We are not certain of the genus or species, but we would hesitate a guess at the genus Misumenops as evidenced by images posted to BugGuide.  Crab Spiders do not build hunting webs.  They ambush their prey using camouflage techniques.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grandaddy Longlegs
Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 6:23 AM
Dear Bug Guy, I know that this bug is probably very familiar to everyone, we called it the grandaddy long legs. There was a rumor growing up that if they could bite they would kill you, I never knew if that was true or not, but I never let one get close enough to bite. I saw this particular grandaddy on some wood we were putting away and noticed the little red things on it. Are they eggs, baby grandaddy’s or some other bug hitching a ride. I think their legs look like spark plug wires, I have never seen them this close. So, since we all know what we call these, what is their real name, and what are the little red things attached to it.
Thnaks so much,
Lisa Benningfield
Eastern Kentucky USA

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Hi Lisa,
This is a Harvestman in the order Opiliones.  They are often called Daddy Long Legs and they are harmless scavengers without venom.  The red creatures are Parasitic Mites in the genus Leptus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination