What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Slaters Nutrition
Sun, Nov 2, 2008 at 1:08 AM
Hi There
Do slaters have omega 3 fatty acids
I’m planning for peak oil
Edward
Tasmania

Slater

Slater

Hi Edward,
We believe David Gracer would be better qualified to answer your questions about the nutritional value of a Slater or Sea Louse, a Marine Isopod. We can’t help but wonder if you are contemplating an appearance on the television series Survivor or just planning for a global disaster with the accompanying food shortage.

Greetings,
Yes, I’ve eaten these guys, and theyíre not bad. I can’t speak to individual species [I never keyed mine out], but there ís a history of documentation on the consumption of woodlice, rolly-pollies, pillbugs, and sowbugs, all of which are terrestrial isopods like this one here. Holt discussed them briefly in his landmark 1885 ìWhy Not Eat Insects?î According the English folk medicine belief in the doctrine of signatures, these isopods were used as medicine because some species rolled into a pill shape. Despite its own disclaimer, this URL features a few recipes.
http://www.geocities.com/~gregmck/woodlice/recipes.htm
Next year I may well farm these ëbugsí in a fishtank environment, and try these preparations for myself.
Best,
Dave

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

3 Responses to Slater

  1. Dave says:

    Hello,

    I’ve never seen nutritional tables for these “bugs,” but they’re edible. There is a history of consumption of woodlice, pillbugs, and sowbugs, all of which are isopods very similar to this one. Holt mentions in his landmark 1885 book “Why Not Eat Insects?” that they were used as folk medicine, that the doctrine of signatures placed them in the role of pills, since some of them rolled into a pill shape. Despite the disclaimer in the address below, I would go by the recipes contained therein. In 2009 I will farm these guys, and try the recipes for myself.

    Dave
    http://www.slshrimp.com

    http://www.geocities.com/~gregmck/woodlice/recipes.htm

  2. Dave says:

    Greetings,

    Yes, they’re edible and I’ve eaten a few in the past. I can’t speak to individual species, but there’s a history of consumption of sowbugs/pillbugs, which are terrestrial isopods just like the one featured here. (Amphipods look quite different but are *probably* edible too). Holt referred to these in his landmark 1885 book “Why Not Eat Insects?” and noted the practice of Olde Time British folk medicine (derived from the doctrine of signatures) included using pillbugs as a kind of medicine, since they looked like pills.
    Here’s a useful URL. I wouldn’t worry about the disclaimer there, and I haven’t tried these recipes yet. Next year I’ll raise my own.

    http://www.geocities.com/~gregmck/woodlice/recipes.htm

    Dave
    http://www.slshrimp.com

  3. Dave says:

    Greetings,

    Yes, I’ve eaten these guys, and they’re not bad. I can’t speak to nutritional findings per se, but from what I’ve seen all arthropods are nutritious, though crustaceans, the ones most commonly eaten, are the least so. And though I don’t know much about individual species [I never keyed mine out], but there’s a history of documentation on the consumption of woodlice, rolly-pollies, pillbugs, and sowbugs, all of which are terrestrial isopods like this one here. Holt discussed them briefly in his landmark 1885 “Why Not Eat Insects?” According the English folk medicine belief in the doctrine of signatures, these isopods were used as medicine because some species rolled into a pill shape. If you Google ‘woodlice recipes’ you’ll find a site with its own disclaimer, but I’m sure they’re fine to eat. Next year I may well farm these ‘bugs’ in a fishtank environment, and try these preparations for myself.
    Best,
    Dave
    http://www.slshrimp.com

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