From the monthly archives: "October 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Walking Stick on Maui but where’s it from?
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 12:53 PM
Walking Stick on Maui but where’s it from?
Aloha from Maui again. Here’s a walking stick found earlier this month in the late afternoon. The folks at BugGuide and the Bishop Museum, Honolulu seem to be stumped about where this guy/gal came from. It was attached to my back window. About 5-6″ long. Love how the long legs have the antennae tucked between them in the front of the body. It was gone in the morning. About 2 weeks later, another one showed up on the other side of the house. Will send that separately. Imagine my surprise to see this second walking stick on the front door of my house. This one was shorter about 4-5″, much more ‘awake’ than the other one. They do not appear to be the same kind of walking stick from their leg position and coloring, unless this is an earlier version in their life cycle. Mahalo nui loa – Thanks for all!
Eliza
Ha`iku, Maui

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Hi Eliza,
If your local museum and BugGuide are stumped, we don’t know what more we can do but to post your photos and hope a reader can provide an answer. With the proliferation of exotic pets from around the world, many of which are insects, it isn’t entirely impossible that this is some exotic species that escaped or was released. The leg position in your first photo is a common resting posture of Phasmids.

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Update:  December 15, 2008
Hello
I would just like to let you know IDs for some of the phasmid (walking
stick) pics you have on your site:
entry 23. 0ctober 2008 – this phasmid from Hawaii is Sipyloidea sipylus.
This species is not native to Hawaii, but to south east asia (like
Malayisa for example). But it has been introduces to several new
locations, like Madagascar and Hawaii
wishing you all the best
Dr. Bruno Kneubühler  (Switzerland)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi WTB !
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 10:25 AM
I found this bug on a Ragweed plant during spring, but have also seen it around lights at night and also other ragweed during summer. It looks closest like a Plant Bug, but not quite. I live in Northeast Georgia, around the mountains. I cannot find it anywhere on the internet ! Please help me!
Luke
Murrayville, Georgia

Plant Bug

Plant Bug

Hi Luke,
We agree that this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae based on the long thin antennae and slender legs.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can provide a genus or species since the matching image we found on BugGuide was identified as an Ornate Plant Bug,
Reuteroscopus ornatus.

Plant Bug

Plant Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some sort of blister beetle?
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 1:34 PM
We were out walking Jester again and nearly tripped over this fellow walking down the road. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a macro lens or adapter with me so the photos aren’t all that good, but I couldn’t resist.
There do seem to be rather a lot of these beetles around lately — I don’t actually remember ever seeing them at all, before.
Have I mentioned lately how much I enjoy this site?
Thanks,
Pat
Southwest Michigan (about a mile or so from Lake Michigan)

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Pat,
Your Blister Beetle is in the genus Meloe, the Oil Beetles.  The common name refers to the oily substance that is emitted by the joints of the leg.  This oily substance contains cantharidin which is a skin irritant explaining the common name Blister Beetle used for the entire family Meloidae.  The infamous aphrodisiac Spanish Fly was originally derived from a European relative Lytta vesicatoria.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

beetle
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 1:41 PM
Hi Bugman! My 7 year old daughter saw this beetle(?) crawling on our wooden garage door, and we put it in a container to get a closer look. We’ve been hearing about invasive beetles, mainly japanese long-horned beetles, that have been doing extensive damage in Massachusetts. We looked up as much as we could online, and feel pretty confident that this is not a long-horn, but are curious if you can identify it. It’s quite beautiful! My daughter would like to bring it in to school to share, and as much info as you can provide would be greatly appreciated!
Marcy Lee
Lexington, Massachusetts

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Marcy Lee,
This is not a beetle.  It is a True Bug in the order Hemiptera.  It is in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs.  It is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, a species native to the Pacific Northwest that has greatly expanded its geographic range in recent years.  They are frequently noticed at this time of year when they try to enter homes to hibernate over the winter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Colorful insect found in woods
Wed, Oct 22, 2008 at 7:55 AM
Hello,
I found this insect in the woods hiding behind a piece of bark. I noticed the red on his leg as he squeezed in to hide. I cannot figure out what kind he is! At first I thought it was a box elder bug, but aside from the giant white spot, his head is a different shape.
He moved very slowly, and did not try to hide again after I had exposed him from the bark.
Bug world enthusiast
John James Audobon National Park, Henderson, KY

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi Enthusiast,
This is an Assassin Bug with no common name.  It is Microtomus purcis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

identify bug
Wed, Oct 22, 2008 at 1:03 PM
This bug is found sometimes in the bath tubs or the sinks in my house so I assume they are coming from the drain. How can I get rid of them?
Rich
Tubs and Sinks in Bathrooms

Silverfish

Silverfish

Hi Rich,
This is a Silverfish, long considered a household pest.  The person who can figure out how to safely discourage them from entering and infesting homes will be an instant millionaire.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination