From the monthly archives: "October 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating Large Tolype
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 4:18 AM
Thought you would like a picture of two Tolype mating. These were on the side of a large flower pot. I took this picture on 9/22/08. I live in Geetingsville, Indiana, located in central Indiana. I do not know what that is on the pot to the left of the Tolype. About a week later it was gone. Thanks, Diane Little
Diane
Geetingsville, IN. Central Indiana

Large Tolype Moths Mating

Large Tolype Moths Mating

Hi Diane,
WE agree that this pair is more likely the Large Tolype, Tolype velleda, than the Small Tolype, Tolype notialis, based on the comments on BugGuide. The species is also called the Velleda Lappet Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orb weaver nookie
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:57 AM
Just wanted to share a picture of the two Orb weavers we shared our patio with this summer. We live in Charleston, SC. We named them Lilith and Frasier. Unfortunately, Lilith disappeared about a week after this photo was taken.
Amy
Charleston, SC

Golden Silk Spider Courtship

Golden Silk Spider Courtship

Hi Amy,
What an amazing photo of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders, Nephila clavipes.  We are not sure who was named Lilith, but the larger of the pair is the female.  We would think that it would have been the smaller male that vanished.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this blue and black butterfly?
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 12:23 PM
I live in Central FL (Orlando area) and saw a black and blue butterfly on one of my sunflowers. It had orange and white spots under his wings. I have looked on a TON of butterfly sites and cannot figure out what kind of butterfly it is. I’d love to know!
Kate
Orlando, FL

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Hi Kate,
Your butterfly is a Pipevine Swallowtail, Battus philenor.  Peter Glassberg, in his book Butterflies through Binoculars The West, writes:  “As butterfly gardeners plant more pipevines, the range of this species will probably  expand.”

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Blue Cicada?
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:23 AM
Blue Cicada?
This little guy was found near a stream near the Blue Ridge Mountains in Northern Virginia. It is about .75 of a centimeter. Has the eyes and wings of cicada, I think. Blue and Red stripes are unique.
thanks, Don
Neersville, VA stream

Unknown Treehopper

Unknown Treehopper

Hi Don,
These are Treehoppers, and Treehoppers are related to Cicadas. Treehoppers are in the family Membracidae and Cicadas are in the family Cicadidae. Both are in the superfamily Cicadoidea. We tried searching the entries posted to BugGuide for the family Membracidae, but we could not find a match to your specimen. Perhaps some reader will be able to provide an answer.

Unknown Treehopper

Unknown Treehopper

Update: October 27, 2008
We just received a comment from a reader raising the possibility of this being an Oak Treehopper. We noticed the similarity in coloration when we searched BugGuide, but we neglected to read the information on the species, Platycotis vittata. We overlooked the possibility as the images on BugGuide of adults all have a horn, but the information states: “Grayish spotted with yellow, or turquoise with red stripes and red eyes. With or without a thorn-like horn” and “There are four named varieties and several other color variations, and some individuals lack the pronotal horn.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unknown insect?
Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 10:15 PM
While preparing to move things in for the winter, I found these six bugs huddled together behind something for protection against the rain and cold. They are on the side of a tall, fake rock flower bed. I’ve had what I thought were crickets in my basement for the last two summers, but didn’t pay much attention, other then they never made any noises, which I found unusual. The ones in my basement may have looked like these I didn’t pay much attention, I just got them out of there. They don’t jump real well. They freaked my daughter out every time she went down there. What are the ones on the wall?? Please help me I’m stumped.
Jenny
Missouri

Camel Crickets

Camel Crickets

Hi Jenny,
We get numerous requests for the identification of Camel Crickets or Cave Crickets in the family Rhaphidophoridae, but rarely do we get an accompanying photo as awesome as yours. According to BugGuide: “If these occur in a house the best treatment is to remove them and their breeding habitat – cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements. A clean dry home will not be a welcoming place for these guys. Although they are scary-looking they are basically harmless to humans, except perhaps for minor damage to stored items, and are easily discouraged by eliminating the dark damp habitat they prefer.” We are wondering if we will hear from David Gracer that they are edible.

Thank you for identifying these!  Now that you have, I’ve done a little reading. That they eat their own limbs to avoid starving.  Apparently the ones on the left ate their back right legs.  I wondered why they were missing.  We have had a few in the basement. But I found these outside.  I have been collecting fossil rocks, I guess its time to put them in a plastic container and away inside.
Thanks so much for your help.

Camel Crickets

Camel Crickets

Hi again Jenny,
Thanks for the additional information.  We also got a comment from a reader who discovered some eating canine feces and David Gracer wrote back that though they are theoretically edible, Camel Crickets probably don’t taste very good because of their diet.  Many members in this order, Orthoptera, will cannibalize their own species if they can’t find food.  Also, legs get lost for a variety of reasons, and may be eaten if they are severed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider Wasp: Pompilidae family
Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 8:25 PM
Hi Daniel,
This wasp was scurrying up a gum tree with a large spider for lunch.
See http://www.geocities.com/ brisbane_wasps/YellowAntWasp.htm for more information about this predator.
Grev
East Coast Australia

Spider Wasp with prey from Australia

Spider Wasp with prey from Australia

Hi Grev,
Nice to hear from you again. Thanks so much for helping to expand our new What’s That Bug Down Under? portion of our website.  By the way, adult Spider Wasps don’t eat spiders.  The spiders are food for the wasp larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination