What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Golden Silk Spider…and Its Web Full of Prey!!
Hello, Bug-people!
I am an amateur photographer and a huge fan of your awesome website. I currently live in southwestern Mississippi and a few days ago my dad found an enormous (for a bug) spider which your site helped me identify as a Golden Silk Spider. It’s between an inch and two inches long and has spun a giant web…which is situated ever so conveniently across the place where we walk very often.
Anyway, I got out and took several pictures of it which I have attached to this e-mail. Interestingly, the pics look almost exactly like the one you have on your first spider page, but mine are much clearer, so I thought you’d like them for your archives.
I know you are very busy, but if you could answer a question for me I would greatly appreciate it: Are these spiders aggressive, and is there any particular reason it would start clicking its jaws at me? When I got too close to it it started wiggling its mouth-parts around…very menacing, considering it’s a spider.
Thanks as always for your wonderful site, and enjoy the photos!
Tori Myers, 13

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Hi Tori,
Thanks for sending us your beautiful photo. We tend to define aggression as actively trying to threaten or inflict harm. Orb Weaver Spiders sit in their webs, and the behavior you describe is more defensive than offensive. We have not gotten any reports of anyone being bitten by a Golden Silk Spider, but they are large spiders with strong jaws and the possibility does exist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
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One Response to Golden Silk Spider

  1. SGraves says:

    As to the question of aggression, my husband accidently walked into a Golden Silk Spider’s nest in TX while visiting a state park. There were loads of these webs along the grassy wooded bank he was going through, each with its resident spider in the center. Only after getting covered in spider web did he realize his mistake and started wildly swinging his arm. The poor spider was about as afraid as he was as it methodically began walking down his back to get away! She just wanted to get away from this “wild beast!” — Stefanie

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