What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bush Bees – Colorado
I live in the Denver, CO area and I have a bush in my front yard that has hundreds of bees hovering around it constantly. Is this because the bush and it’s small flowers are particularly appealing to bees ? Or … is there possibly a ground hive of some sort underneath the bush ? I have looked inside the bush and there is no above ground hive that I can see. I have 2 small children which play in the yard frequently. While I know bees aren’t aggressive there’s a good chance they’ll get stung accidentally because of the sheer quantity. How can I locate the burrow (if there is one) and how would I get them to leave without carnage ? Granite over the burrow as with a previous post? Thank you for your help

These are Honey Bees, most likely domestic bees from a nearby apiarist’s hives. Honey Bees will travel great distances to a likely food source, and that is probably the case here. Honey Bees do not nest underground, and wild hives are generally found in hollow trees and in little used areas of buildings, like crawl spaces. While we understand your fear of your young children being stung, you would be far better served to properly educate them that the Honey Bees are not aggressive, and they will not sting unless provoked. Here at What’s That Bug? we do not really feel qualified to give parenting advice, but we believe if you teach your children not to touch the Honey Bees or bother them, it will better protect your children in the future and they can avoid being stung when not under your immediate watchful eye.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Denver, Colorado

One Response to Honey Bee

  1. Kitt says:

    A belated note from Denver (I stopped by to look for info on a black-and-white bee): The honey bees in question are not necessarily from an apiary, as Denver is full of bee trees. I know of at least ten within a three-block radius of my house.

    The best time to spot them is in early spring on a warm day before the trees leaf out. Many big, old street trees have likely cavities. You can see the bees on orientation flights, hovering in front of the hive entrance.

    Last summer, I saw five swarms in my neighborhood, and two so far this year. We have a LOT of feral bees.

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