From the monthly archives: "June 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

More clumps of mining bees
Hello folks!
Enjoy the website and it’s addicitive to say the least! Discovered these little critters clinging to our lavender, here in Eagle Rock, a northern suburb of Los Angeles right next to Pasadena. Someone else was asking why these — apparently mining bees, from what you told the other photographer from July 29, 2007– male bees were doing this. All I know, is that for that last month or so, (that would be mid-May to mid-June) these fellows flitter about the lavender during the day and then, when it cools down, they all gather back to this SAME STALK and huddle together for the night. Sometimes, the stalk is completely covered with them! They are there in the mornings when I go get the newspaper! Not sure what the behavior means, but I am glad to see them everyday! Best,
Brenda Rees
Eagle Rock CA

Hi Brenda,
We actually believe these are Long Horned Bees in the tribe Eucerini. There is a photo from Arizona posted to BugGuide, and the photographer says 100s of bees congregated on dried weeds at sunset. We have gotten reports of this nightime aggregating behavior in solitary Hymenopterans, both bees and wasps. We have seen them called Bachelor Parties since they are only males. We will contact Eric Eaton for verification that these are Long Horned Bees and see if he can provide a genus. Meanwhile, perhaps we will meet at Eagle Rock Italian Bakery some day. We love the semolina bread they only bake on Friday. We can also be spotted at the Blue Hen and the Coffee Table on occasion since we live nearby in Mt Washington. Thanks for the nice letter and wonderful image neighbor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of beetle is this?
Hi there,
My family and I were at Government House in Victoria and this beetle landed on one of us. We haven’t been able to find it in a BC insect identification book. It looked similar to the Tiger Beetles on your web page but it had much shorter legs than those. It’s body had a very metallic sheen to it. Thanks for your help!

This beauty is a Golden Buprestid, Buprestis aurulenta, one of the Flat Headed Borers in the family Buprestidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Apple tree lovers
I had to cut down my apple tree. It was hit with some disease from my neighbor’s fruit tree and died. When I went to cut it down, I found several of these bugs crawling up and down the trunk and on the branches. They were about a 1⁄2 inch long. At first I thought they might be some sort of immature wasp since my yard seems overrun this year with paper wasps, but after looking carefully at the photos I took, it doesn’t seem likely. I’ve asked several friends who are pretty good at bug ID but no one has seen these before and no one has a name for me. Can you help? I’d like to know if they might have helped cause the tree’s death or if are they something that might endanger other plants or people. Thanks for your help. This web site rocks!
Peggy L . Johnson

Hi Peggy,
This is a Borer Beetle in the genus Neoclytus. This might be the Red Headed Ash Borer,Neoclytus acuminatus, but BugGuide, on the page for Neoclytus mucronatus, states there are 26 species in the genus north of Mexico, and many look remarkably alike.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This may be a beetle…?
I skimmed this out of our pool today, we live in northeastern PA. Can you help Identify it?

Your beetle is Saperda candida, the Round Headed Apple Tree Borer and you can find information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Rose caterpillar 2.jpg, Rose caterpillar 1.jpg
We live in Rush, NY (just south of Rochester, NY – western NY) and found these caterpillars devouring my yellow rose bush leaves. There are black little spots/pellets on the leaves as well. Can you help us identify them and also let us know the best way to get rid of them? We would greatly appreciate your help as we have not seen these before. Thank you!!!!
Jen Davin

Hi Jen,
Though they look like caterpillars, this is actually a Sawfly Larva. Sawflies are nonstinging relatives of wasps. There are several Sawfly families, and we believe your specimen is is the family Argidae. It resembles the Birch Sawfly posted to BugGuide. Many Sawflies are social feeders, and the group often exhibits unusual group behavior, with all group members striking unusual poses and changing position in tandem.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth or Butterfly in WI
Hi: This beautiful creature was drying it’s wings (or so I’m guessing) by hanging upside down on our garage door trim this morning. It’s beautiful. I’m unable to find it in my field guide — I’m thinking that it is probably a moth instead of a butterfly because it has such a plump, furry body. I’ve attached several pics that I took this morning. Just would really like to know what it is. Any help you can provide in identifying this beautiful creature would be most appreciated. Thanks!
Ann in WI

Hi Ann,
This is a Cecropia Moth. We have identified so many specimens in the past week, we think it is time to post another photo, and yours is just perfect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination