From the monthly archives: "June 2008"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Gulf Frittialary Love
Hi Bugman!
Thank you for such an amazing website! I find myself checking the garden just for new bugs to identify! I have a beautiful butterfly garden and cater specifically to the gulf fritillary. I just snapped these photos today when I got home from work! Yippee! Mating fritillaries! You can actually see the chrysalis one had emerged from today behind them! So exciting to me! Thought you might enjoy! Take care and keep up the lovely website!
Jayme
Mission Viejo, CA

Hi Jayme,
Thanks for sending us your mating Gulf Fritillary image. Gulf Fritillaries can be found where its larval food plant, passionflower, is planted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug Identification Help
I was hoping you could help me identify this bug. I found it hiding in a dark, narrow space under a notepad on my computer desk. I was surprised to find that it began jumping around. I managed to get it to sit still on a sheet of paper for the attached photos. I got a shot from above and one from the side, although I couldn’t get a shot of the bottom as it would immediately hop to flip itself over every time. It seems to jump when either upside-down or touched, and the jump makes a rather loud snapping noise. I thought it might be a kind of springtail based on some photos on your website, but I couldn’t tell if the body shape completely matched any of them. Thank you,
Kevin Shipley

Hi Kevin,
This is some species of Click Beetle in the family Elateridae. Click Beetles have the capability of righting themselves if on their back by snapping the body at the joint between the thorax and abdomen. This produces a loud click. Here is the more technical explanation posted on BugGuide: “The clicking is made possible by the flexible union of the prothorax and mesothorax and the prosternal spine that fits into a groove on the mesosternum. If they are placed on their backs they use this mechanism to snap and jump usually falling right side up.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this bug?
I was thinking that this was a moth but it closes its wings. So does it mean that it is a butterfly? Thanks for any help.

This is a Rosy Maple Moth. The wing position is actually typical of moths. It is a generalization, but most butterflies fold their wings together over their backs when resting, while moths rest with wings spread apart. There are many exceptions to this generalization.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello! I am hoping you can help me identify this pretty moth. We are in the South Central mountains of Idaho, on a small prairie a mile high.
Thank you!
Tracy Stampke

Hi Tracy,
Your moth is a Columbia Silk Moth, Hyalophora columbia. BugGuide lists sightings in most parts of the U.S. excluding the south. It has several relatives in the same genus. The Ceanothus Silk Moth is found along the Pacific states, and the Cecropia moth if found throughout the east.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Imperial moth, caterpillar, and pupae pics
I could not find this big girl on the site about 9 months ago, so I took her in and helped her complete her lifecycle. I figured these would be good pics for the website. She came out beautiful and full of eggs. The cercaria label was my old hunch….guess i was wrong….HA
Dr. Coleman

Hi Dr. Coleman,
We are thrilled to have gotten your Imperial Moth Metamorphosis series. We have numerous photos of Imperial Moth Caterpillars on our site, and we also have numerous adult moth images, filed on our Saturnid Moth pages of Giant Silk Moths. Your submission neatly places most of the life cycle in one concise letter. Thanks again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

dragonfly
What is the name of this found two in my yard and have never seen them around before.

The Ebony Jewelwing, Calopteryx maculata, is a Damselfly, not a Dragonfly. Damelflies and Dragonflies are in the same insect order Odonata, but different suborders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination