From the monthly archives: "October 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug on a leash
Hi bugman. Some of my friends went to Mexico this summer. They brought me these pictures of this weird bug. It was on a leash! What kind of bug is this? Thanks,
Francesco Saverio

Hi Francesco,
This is a Peanut Headed Lanternfly, Fulgora lanternaria, which is found in the Central and South American tropics. According to Wikipedia, this insect, known as the Machaca in the Amazon, has a very interesting superstition surrounding it: “In several countries, such as Ecuador ,Colombia and Venezuela , there exists the myth that if somebody is bitten by the machaca , he or she must have sex within 24 hours to prevent an otherwise incurable death. The insect is actually harmless to people.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug crawling on slime
Hi,
I took these pictures last night – can’t find anything on your website to identify it, although it looks very unique and is quite easily described.
Could you please help me identify it? And maybe an opinion as to it’s destructiveness and whether I should try to eliminate it? Thank you,
Ken Johnson

Hi Ken,
This is a Webspinner. It is only the second photo we have ever received from the Order Embiidina, commonly called Webspinners or sometimes Footspinners. Some males are winged, and some males and all females are wingless. According to BugGuide: “silk galleries are spun under stones and bark, in debris, cracks in soil or bark, among grass roots, lichens, mosses, and epiphytic plants winged males of some species are attracted to artificial light” and they are “more numerous during the rainy season” and their food consists of “dead plant material plus lichens and mosses found around their galleries.” They are not destructive and there is no need to eliminate them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats this (wasp)?
I’m in Jacksonville Florida and saw this little guy on on Cassia tree. Check out those hind legs! It also appears to have a (face?) on it’s rear end.. Can you tell me what it is please? I love your site, you guys and your contributors are amazing! Thanks,
George Fleischer

Hi George,
This is some species of Chalcid Wasp in the family Chalcididae. We found a match on BugGuide, but the species is not identified. We believe this might be in the genus Spilochalcis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

yellow star-fish like spider
Dear Mr. Bug Man,
I am wondering if you could please help me identify this rather large and intrusive spider. He was found on the inside of my 17 month old’s bedroom window screen. We live in Massachusetts. Thank you,
Jenn Romano

Hi Jenn,
This is a harmless Nursery Web Spider, Pisaurina mira. The photos we have received of this species in the past are a decidely different color pattern, but we did locate a matching individual on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two-tailed spider, Australia
Dear Bugman,
I noticed this smallish spider on the bark of a gum tree, only through my camera lens. Its camouflage is quite efficient. It took some time to identify, but I think it is the Two-tailed spider, Tamopsis. It is a very fast-moving spider, using a sort of combined jumping-scurrying movement. For the past couple of weeks I have been back to the tree, and the spider is always there, in the same place, without any web that I can see. One day there was a smaller, darker companion, which I think is the male. Thanks for your site, which I always find fascinating. Kind wishes,
Grev

Hi Grev,
It has been some time since you have sent us a new photo. Thanks for providing this Two Tailed Spider for our archives. We are linking to the University of Queensland Find a Spider site which substantiates your identification of this distinctive spider with long spinnerets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pink Spotted Hawkmoth
Dear Bugman:
Here is one of a series of photos that I have taken over the last few days. This Pink Spotted Hawkmoth is feeding in our garden on the numerous Moon Flowers. Please feel free to post this photo on your website. Bye for now,
Kurt K. Weiss

Hi Kurt,
Thank you for taking the time to send us a second email. There is not enough time to post every letter and image we receive, or even to answer every letter. We appreciate your patience and your lovely photograph has been posted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination