From the monthly archives: "September 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this bug?
Found this one in Ocala, Florida. Learned real fast not to touch this one for it let out one heck of a stink!
Curtis

Hi Curtis,
These are mating Muskmares, or more correctly, a Muskmare and her stallion. They are Anisomorpha buprestoides, Two-striped Walkingsticks. The smell you mentioned was the least of your worries. These Walkingsticks can shoot a noxious substance from glands in the “neck” region with amazing accuracy. They have hit more than one of our readers in the eye and the irritation and blurry vision may last for hours.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Preying Mantis Threesome
Hi Bugman!
I just stumbled across your fantastic website while searching for pictures of a Mantis Threesome. No, I’m not a pervert! I just found these guys “doing it” at my kitchen window and since I’ve never seen Mantis Lovin’ before, I wanted to see how common it was for two males to be attempting to mate with one female. At one point while taking pictures, I’m quite sure she said, “Will you please get this knuckleheads off me???”. Blessings,
Amy Jordan
Andrews, Texas

Hi Amy,
If you have looked at our site closely, you know that we have received another documentation of Preying Mantis group sex. Thanks for sending us your excellent candid documentation of this not quite rare occurrance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx Spider
I was told this is a green lynx spider, and thought you might enjoy these photos I took of one on my passion vine.

What a wonderful addition to our Food Chain pages: a Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Gulf Fritillary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

After going to your website after my first experience with the Cicada Killer( at the time, I had no idea what it was), I thought I would share a pic with you. Thanks for having your website and solving my "mystery". Many thanks,
Mike and Kathy
Oxford Florida

Hi Mike and Kathy,
We just recently removed the Cicada Killer from our homepage since identification requests, which peaked in July, had dwindled. Looks like your robust female Cicada Killer has nabbed a Dog Day Harvestfly for her brood’s meal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Normally, at our Mt. Washington office, we see Western Tiger Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails. Both have proven to be very camera shy. This year, for the first time, we have seen Giant Swallowtails, at least 3 individuals. Our lantana shrubs have gotten to a good size and there is a profuse bloom this year. While lantana is not one of our favorite plants, we have to admit we were very excited it forwarded us the opportunity to get close enough to photograph this Giant Swallowtail today. It should be noted that Giant Swallowtails were first reported in the Los Angeles basin in 1998.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hickory Horned Devil Variation?
Greetings,
I found this little beauty while walking around our farm on a photography stroll. The reddish/plum color caterpillar was on a sweetgum. I’ve looked around the .net and found no specimens that looked like this one….excpet for the Hickory Horned Devil. Could not find one unless it was green in color, but the markings and the horns were almost identical on some of the photographs I saw. Photo taken on September 3, 2007
Jose

Hi Jose,
This is a Hickory Horned Devil in its third instar. Caterpillars go through five instars as they grow, each time shedding their skin and changing appearance. In some species the change is quite dramatic. In two more molts, your specimen will be much larger and have the characteristic blue green coloration with red horns of the fifth instar, fully grown Hickory Horned Devil. BugGuide has a nice series of images from egg to final instar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination