From the monthly archives: "July 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Photos . . .
Hi Everyone,
I really enjoy your website. I realize that you already have several examples of the Imperial Moth posted. However, I am attaching two photos I took a couple of days ago. My wife spied this beautiful creature asleep during the heat of the day in a small evergreen that sits right outside our bedroom window. She rushed into the house and had me grab the camera and take some shots. This moth has a wingspan nearly four inches and his markings and coloration are nearly impeccable. My family have really enjoyed these pictures and thought that others would like to see them as well. Hope you like them as much as we do. Sincerely,
Jim Green
Enterprise, Alabama

Hi Jim,
This is probably the best, most detailed image we have ever received of an Imperial Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi,
Can you tell me what this is? I live in Lake Worth, Florida. Thanks,
Cherrie

Hi Cherrie,
This is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth, Empyreuma affinis. They are wasp mimics.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bug picture
Dear Bugman,
thanks so much for this site! This very strange bug was on a neighboring tent at an art fair in Waterville, Maine, today and all day long NO ONE could identify it. Some said it was a Stone fly, but I searched and searched and none of them was like it. So then I searched on "flies with pincers" and found your site, and another picture of this guy was on top of your page! I am emailing this photo with the ruler next to it because it’s such a good one. THANKS!
Pam Ellis,
Rangeley, Maine

Hi Pam,
Thanks for sending us your great photo of a male Dobsonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bugs on my tomato plants
Hi. I read the whole section on tomato bugs, but I cannot seem to figure out what is going on with my tomato plants. I saw a large hornworm on the plant a few weeks ago, but not knowing what it was, I didn’t do anything about it. I was away for a few days and I came home to find one of my plum tomato plants virtually destroyed by these black bugs that have been eating the leaves and pooping all over it. I am attaching a picture for your reference. I am sorry that some of these photos are a big blurry. I actually caught one of the bugs in pooping action. What can I do about these things? Thanks so much!
Rebecca
From Pennsylvania

Hi Rebecca,
This is a Margined Blister Beetle,
Epicauta funebris. Sorry, we cannot provide any extermination advice. We remove pests on our tomatoes by hand.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Never have seen one of these before
This guy flew right at me as I was sitting on my back porch and instinct lead him to hit the ground. He is nearly two inches long and was not able to fly after the impact but he jumped like a Mexican jumping bean. Even on his back, he would pop up into the air nearly a foot high. No wings were being used, apparently just some weird internal mechanism. The picture is a little blurry, I apologize. I was trying to take it as fast as possible before it jumped on me. Hopefully you can identify this amazingly armored insect. He is hard as a rock and a series of swats from the swatter did nothing but make him jump more. I know you don’t approve of such actions, but he really gave me the creeps. I live in Collinsville, IL and there are cornfields nearby the area. Thank you for your time.
Kris

Hi Kris,
Both your photo and your written description leave little doubt that this is a Click Beetle in the family Elateridae, but exact species, genus or even subfamily will be nearly impossible to determine based on a photograph. Click Beetles have the ability to flex at the junction of the thorax and abdomen with enough pressure to snap the beetle into the air so it will land on its feet if it began in a seemingly helpless position on its back. This action produces an audible click, hence the name Click Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Caterpiller Hunter?
Hello,
I am sending photos of a large beetle I found. Someone told me it was a Caterpillar Hunter. I had never seen or heard of it before. I looked on your website for an ID but did not find one. Maybe I have the wrong name. Could you let me know the correct name for this beetle. It had beautiful colors when the sun was out. Sincerely,
Annette Oliveira
Long Island, NY

Hi Annette,
This gorgeous Caterpillar Hunter is known as the Fiery Searcher, Calosoma scrutator. We did hear that our search engine was not working properly yesterday, but it is fully operational today.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination