From the monthly archives: "April 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Crab spider
Hi bugman,
Just a pic taken this morning on an early purple orchid, taken in our garden in the Dordogne region of France, great site, thanks
Jeff Warrington

Hi Jeff,
What a wonderful image! Crab Spiders are also known as Flower Spiders and are able to change color to match their surroundings. Your spider is quite the rebel, standing out so boldly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Glover Silkmoth
While visiting your website, I came across one of the caterpillars you identified as Ceanothus Silkmoth. I thought the photo resembled the Glover Silkmoth, are they the same? I live in southern Arizona. I found a glover silkmoth and then began to raise them last year. Here are some photos of the Glover Silkmoths that I raised, one as a caterpillar and one of a male that recently hatched.
Amy

Hi Amy,
Glover’s Silk Moth, Hyalophora columbia gloveri, is a subspecies of the Columbia Silk Moth, Hyalophora columbia, which is found in Arizona. The Columbia Silk Moth is closely related the the Ceanothus Silk Moth, Hyalophora euryalus, which is not found in Arizona. Our identification of that caterpillar was based incorrectly on its range, cince the Ceanothus Silk Moth is found west of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Columbia Silk Moth ranging to the east. Thank you for sending us both the caterpillar and adult photo and correcting our earlier error.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What the heck is this thing???
Hello –
These larvae are in our swimming pool. I noticed them this morning submerged with their breathing "tube" attached to the water surface, similar to what you see with mosquito larvae. These are about 1 inch long. The top [left] picture is the dorsal view, and the bottom [right] is supine. If you are able to ID then my next question is if these are harmful to humans. Thanks!
Sam Rua
Tucson

Hi Sam,
This is some type of Aquatic Maggot, or Fly larva. We will bet on it being a Horse Fly Larva. We can find similar images online, including a drawing, but no exact match. BugGuide has an interesting entry from a person who was bitten by a Horse Fly Larva. As far as the adult flies go, only the females bite. Horse Flies are also known as Gad Flies. Eric Eaton then wrote in with the following comments: ” Daniel: I suspect these are actually the larvae of soldier flies (family Stratiomyiidae), but I’m not positive. Typically, horse fly larvae have a leathery appearance, and are much larger (mature specimens at least). Eric”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Potato bug? not sure, please help?
Dear Bugman,
We’ve found this bug in our garden, it was walking across the grass in full daylight (good thing, I wouldn’t want to come across it at night! I’ve browsed your website and it sort of looks like a potato bug, but this one has two antenna’s at the end, not just one.
It’s about 8 cm long. Can you help please? And could you, if not a potato bug, tell us whether they are harmless to children or not? Thank you!
ps: we found it in Leiden, The Netherlands (Europe) and I’m not sure as to whether potato bugs are native here, I sure never seen them before!
Kind regards,
Anne-Karina van Wilgenburg

Hi Anne-Karina,
This is actually a Mole Cricket. We get images of Mole Crickets from all over the world, including many from the troops in the Middle East. Mole Crickets are subterranean, though many species can fly. They eat roots. They have strong jaws, and might bite, but the bite contains no poison and is more of a pinch than anything else.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Caterpiller??
Found this one on my grapefruit tree. There were actually two of them and they were moving. Seems that the larger end is the head. What is it? Thanks in advance,
Richard R. Gongora
Houston, TX

Hi Richard,
This is the caterpillar of the Giant Swallowtail, commonly known as an Orange Dog.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cool Looking Beetle
Hi,
I found his little guy in my store the other night and took him home to show my kids. It gave the girls a good squeal. They loved it, the next morning we let it go. They wanted to keep it and wanted to know what it eats, but if it’s a Caterpillar Hunter (Calosoma Scrutator) I’m not feeding it! Is that what it is? Love Those Critters
Oklahoma
P.S Love your site!

Hi Oklahoma,
You are correct. This is a Caterpillar Hunter and it is a beautiful specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination