From the monthly archives: "February 2007"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pupa ID
Hello, Here in the wet Northwest, our family has been watching what appears to be a pupa for four months. It is attached to a small rosebush on our deck. Can anyone identify it? When can we expect a metamorphosis?
Thanks,
Elliott,
Keizer OR

Hi Elliot,
The silken girdle that keeps this chrysalis upright immediately identifies it as one of the Swallowtail Butterflies. Sorry, we cannot identify the exact species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Apologies for not getting back to you sooner. I discovered it was the Citrus Swallowtail, my address is southern Queensland in Australia and it hatched out yesterday, see the photos i’m pleased to attach, i was so sure i’d miss the moment. How do they fit into the case, it IS a miracle./
dawn

Hi again Dawn,
Thank you so much for the followup images of the metamorphosis of the spectacular caterpillar you sent our way on January 19. Your photos are all wonderful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Water Bug
In October of 2006 I started an small enclosed microecosystem with a fish, snails, and plants. It all lived until recently, however, a new bug has popped up inside and the container has never been opened. He is very skinny, with about 10 body segments, a tail that looks like three small feathers, what I believe to be antennea, and is tan in color. He has been growing and likes to stay at the bottom of the container on the rocks or in the plants. What is he???? A new type of bug? Thanks!!!
Erin F.
p.s. I attached the best pictures I could get in the water.

Hi Erin,
This is a Damselfly Naiad. It will become a winged adult. Damselfly Naiads are often introduced into aquaria on water plants. The three feathered “tail” are the gills.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Have I discovered a new bug?!
The diameter of the ball on top looks like mabe 1.5 mm. When not walking it retreats to some extent under it’s ball. When it walks, viewed from above it looks as though it is riding on wheels, so perfectly smooth is its motion. I found it in a canyon in Los Angeles. Thank you very much.
Terry Payne

Hi Terry,
This is a Debris Carrying Lacewing Larva. Some Lacewings carry debris, including the carcasses of prey, as protection and camouflage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ootheca hatching
Hello Sir,
That’s wonderful what Lisa and Daniel from SHIRTSOFBAMBOO.COM did for WHATSTHATBUG.COM. They’re very kind and generous people to have donated the additional bandwidth. I send my heartfelt gratitude to Lisa and Daniel! Here are a couple of images I took of a Southern Carolina Mantid ootheca while the nymphs were emerging. I hope you can use these images to help promote the fascinating world of bugs. Thank you for one of the best bug websites on the net! Sincerely,
Troy D. (Keyser, WV)

Hi Troy,
We are really indebted to Lisa and Daniel. Thanks for your great Ootheca image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth found at work
Hi there, this moth was found by a co-worker. It was found today, alive. I live in Minnesota and it is 0 degrees outside. I am wondering where it is usually found, and if it is possibly not native to north America. We have him in the container still, if you need a better picture of his body. It looks like a lot of the silkworm moths on your site, except for it’s antennae. Also when it’s wings are closed it is completely black from all sides. Me and a few others are very fascinated, and would like to know more about this moth.
Thanks, Dan from Twin Cities, Minnesota !!!!!

Hi Dan,
This is a butterfly, the European Peacock, Inachis io, and it is not native. According to the Butterflies of North America site, the European Peacock is a “Rare stray or transport to North America.” Adults do hibernate over the winter. More information can be found on the Wikipedia site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination