Man-Faced Bug?
Hello bugman,
Found a couple of shield bugs near my place,but was the only one I was able to catch. I’ve seen them before and known them as man-faced beetles, so it’s time for a proper identification. Wondering whether they have a specific food plant or not. I think they’re relatively rare here and about 2.5 to 3 cm long. Singapore Thanks
Jon

Hi Jon,
We got a photo of a mating pair of these Stink Bugs, also from Singapore, earlier in the month. At that time, Eric Eaton provided the following two possible families: “I’d guess either Pentatomidae or Acanthosomatidae.” Soon after posting, a reader sent this information: ” The man faced-bug is a pentatomidae probably Canthacantus nigripens !”

4 Responses to Unknown Stink Bug from Singapore identified

  1. Pat says:

    The photo shows an adult Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773 (Man-Faced Stinkbug), family Pentatomidae. It is native to India & much of SE Asia (including S’pore).

    * Photo of adult insect, Brunei (Discover Life – 11 Mar 2008)
    * Photo of female guarding eggs, Penang Butterfly Farm

    See also my comment at ‘Mating Stink Bugs from (probably) Singapore’ (What’s That Bug ? – 12 Feb 2007).

    @ Jon: “I think they’re relatively rare here and about 2.5 to 3 cm long. Singapore”

    This stinkbug species is not very rare in S’pore. This photo shows 2 specimens at the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity. Check out this page for recent sightings (11 Jun 2013) at the Gardens By The Bay.

    @ Jon: “Wondering whether they have a specific food plant or not.”

    In S’pore, Catacanthus incarnatus feeds on the sap, flowers, flower/ fruit buds & nectar of various flowering & fruiting plants, such as Syzygium spp, Ixora spp. & Lantana camera. In fact, the above hyperlink for the sightings at the Gardens By The Bay show the insects feeding on Ixora flowers &/or nectar. This photo shows a pair of them on an Ixora plant at Penang Butterfly Farm.

    This stinkbug is also known to feed on Santalum album (Indian Sandalwood) in India, as well as observed to congregate on Microcos tomentosa (Cenderai) in Thailand (Khao Phra Thaew Ecological Sustainability Project, 2009). Photo of Microcos tomentosa as grown in S’pore.

    * Plant Host Records Pentatomidae (North Dakota State University)

  2. Pat says:

    The photo shows an adult Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773 (Man-Faced Stinkbug), family Pentatomidae. It is native to India & much of SE Asia (including S’pore).

    * Photo of adult insect, Brunei (Discover Life – 11 Mar 2008)
    * Photo of female guarding eggs, Penang Butterfly Farm

    See also my comment at ‘Mating Stink Bugs from (probably) Singapore’ (What’s That Bug ? – 12 Feb 2007).

    @ Jon: “I think they’re relatively rare here and about 2.5 to 3 cm long. Singapore”

    This stinkbug species is not very rare in S’pore. This photo shows 2 specimens at the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity. Check out this page for recent sightings (11 Jun 2013) at the Gardens By The Bay.

    @ Jon: “Wondering whether they have a specific food plant or not.”

    In S’pore, Catacanthus incarnatus feeds on the sap, flowers, flower/ fruit buds & nectar of various flowering & fruiting plants, such as Syzygium spp, Ixora spp. & Lantana camera. In fact, the above hyperlink for the sightings at the Gardens By The Bay show the insects feeding on Ixora flowers &/or nectar. This photo shows a pair of them on an Ixora plant at Penang Butterfly Farm.

    This stinkbug is also known to feed on Santalum album (Indian Sandalwood) in India, as well as observed to congregate on Microcos tomentosa (Cenderai) in Thailand (Khao Phra Thaew Ecological Sustainability Project, 2009). Photo of Microcos tomentosa as grown in S’pore.

    * Plant Host Records Pentatomidae (North Dakota State University)

  3. Pat says:

    [Footnote] Comment from unnamed reader: “The man faced-bug is a pentatomidae probably Canthacantus nigripens !”

    Meaning Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 ? (Note the spelling of the species epithet.) However, that is a synonym — ie. there is no currently-accepted name such as Catacanthus nigripes.

    I think there is some taxonomic confusion between Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 & Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773 (Man-Faced Stinkbug) — ie. the species in the photo featured at the top of this page.

    Note that Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 & Cimex punctum Fabricius, 1787 are synonyms of Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 (Ixora Shield Bug).

    Taxonomic References:
    * Ecological Catalogue of Australia (Gerasimos Cassis, Gordon F. Gross), CSIRO Publishing, 2002 — (pg 463)

    * Catacanthus Spinola, 1837: Species Listing (North Dakota State University)

    The above references also states under the genus Catacanthus Spinola, 1837:
    {{{ “Type Species: Cimex nigripes Fabricius, 1775 (= Cimex incarnatus Drury, 1773), by monotypy.” }}}

    Perhaps this is how the confusion arose amongst some quarters. Do note that Cimex incarnatus Drury, 1773 is not synonymous with Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773.

    Also note how Ecological Catalogue of Australia (2002, as above) highlighted under the Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 entry that this name was “proposed nom. nov for the misidentification of Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775 sensu Sulzer (1776)”.

    Incidentally, this S’pore stamp (issued in 1984) of Catacanthus incarnatus is wrongly mistakenly labelled as Catacanthus nigripes.

    In addition, Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 (syn. Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776; Cimex punctum Fabricius, 1787) has been collected from Australia (Queensland, Sydney), Indonesia (Java, Celebes), Philippines & the Fiji Islands — but it has never been collected or described from S’pore.

    * Catalogue of the Specimens of Heteropterous-Hemiptera in the Collection of the British Museum (Francis Walker) — London: Trustees of the British Museum, 1867-1873 — pg 351 — see Genus 36.1 Catacanthus incarnatus vs. Genus 36.2 Catacanthus nigripes for the respective localities where the specimens were collected from.

    * Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (New York American Museum of Natural History, 1881)– pg 204 – 205 — this entry describes Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 (collected from Australia) as closely-allied to Catacanthus carrenoi Le Guillou, 1841.

    As such, recalling from the aforementioned that:
    (i) Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 = Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 (synonym);
    (ii) Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 is very similar to Catacanthus carrenoi Le Guillou, 1841;

    … the below references describe & depict how both the above 2 species look like respectively. Note that due to the very different colorations & markings, they are quite unlikely to be casually mistaken for Catacanthus incarnatus (Man-Faced Stinkbug).

    * Catacanthus punctus: Info & Photos (Atlas of Living Australia)
    * Catacanthus punctus: Photo, Sulawesi, Indonesia (WildForests Project)

    * A new species of the genus Catacanthus Spinola (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae: Pentatominae) from the New Hebrides with morphological notes on two other Australian species and their relationships (Imtiaz Ahmad & Syed Kamaluddin) — Records of The South Australian Museum (Adelaide) Vol. 18, 1981: pg 227-233

    — For above, see pg 230 for the description & pg 231 for the drawing of Catacanthus punctus.

    — For above, see pg 227 for the description & pg 228 for the drawing of Catacanthus carrenoi.

    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Australia (Philippe Blanchot’s Portrait Gallery of Insects)
    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Lomok, Indonesia (Hou Zuki An’s Bug World)
    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Fiji (Javier M.’s Flickr)

  4. Pat says:

    [Footnote] Comment from unnamed reader: “The man faced-bug is a pentatomidae probably Canthacantus nigripens !”

    Meaning Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 ? (Note the spelling of the species epithet.) However, that is a synonym — ie. there is no currently-accepted name such as Catacanthus nigripes.

    I think there is some taxonomic confusion between Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 & Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773 (Man-Faced Stinkbug) — ie. the species in the photo featured at the top of this page.

    Note that Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 & Cimex punctum Fabricius, 1787 are synonyms of Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 (Ixora Shield Bug).

    Taxonomic References:
    * Ecological Catalogue of Australia (Gerasimos Cassis, Gordon F. Gross), CSIRO Publishing, 2002 — (pg 463)

    * Catacanthus Spinola, 1837: Species Listing (North Dakota State University)

    The above references also states under the genus Catacanthus Spinola, 1837:
    {{{ “Type Species: Cimex nigripes Fabricius, 1775 (= Cimex incarnatus Drury, 1773), by monotypy.” }}}

    Perhaps this is how the confusion arose amongst some quarters. Do note that Cimex incarnatus Drury, 1773 is not synonymous with Catacanthus incarnatus Drury, 1773.

    Also note how Ecological Catalogue of Australia (2002, as above) highlighted under the Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 entry that this name was “proposed nom. nov for the misidentification of Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775 sensu Sulzer (1776)”.

    Incidentally, this S’pore stamp (issued in 1984) of Catacanthus incarnatus is wrongly mistakenly labelled as Catacanthus nigripes.

    In addition, Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 (syn. Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776; Cimex punctum Fabricius, 1787) has been collected from Australia (Queensland, Sydney), Indonesia (Java, Celebes), Philippines & the Fiji Islands — but it has never been collected or described from S’pore.

    * Catalogue of the Specimens of Heteropterous-Hemiptera in the Collection of the British Museum (Francis Walker) — London: Trustees of the British Museum, 1867-1873 — pg 351 — see Genus 36.1 Catacanthus incarnatus vs. Genus 36.2 Catacanthus nigripes for the respective localities where the specimens were collected from.

    * Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (New York American Museum of Natural History, 1881)– pg 204 – 205 — this entry describes Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 (collected from Australia) as closely-allied to Catacanthus carrenoi Le Guillou, 1841.

    As such, recalling from the aforementioned that:
    (i) Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 = Catacanthus nigripes Fabricus, 1775: Sulzer, 1776 (synonym);
    (ii) Catacanthus punctus Fabricius, 1787 is very similar to Catacanthus carrenoi Le Guillou, 1841;

    … the below references describe & depict how both the above 2 species look like respectively. Note that due to the very different colorations & markings, they are quite unlikely to be casually mistaken for Catacanthus incarnatus (Man-Faced Stinkbug).

    * Catacanthus punctus: Info & Photos (Atlas of Living Australia)
    * Catacanthus punctus: Photo, Sulawesi, Indonesia (WildForests Project)

    * A new species of the genus Catacanthus Spinola (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae: Pentatominae) from the New Hebrides with morphological notes on two other Australian species and their relationships (Imtiaz Ahmad & Syed Kamaluddin) — Records of The South Australian Museum (Adelaide) Vol. 18, 1981: pg 227-233

    — For above, see pg 230 for the description & pg 231 for the drawing of Catacanthus punctus.

    — For above, see pg 227 for the description & pg 228 for the drawing of Catacanthus carrenoi.

    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Australia (Philippe Blanchot’s Portrait Gallery of Insects)
    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Lomok, Indonesia (Hou Zuki An’s Bug World)
    * Catacanthus carrenoi: Photo, Fiji (Javier M.’s Flickr)

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