What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cricket for lunch?
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I’m at it again, I tried your link you suggested but this wasp is bucking the Huntsman trend. Is it the Cryptocheilus bicolour again please? For someone who has been badly bitten by a Whitetail spider I still love my ‘bugs’. My husband took this in our spring, fairly cool day by our standards and the wasp totally ignored us. Cheers,
Karen
Halls Head, Western Australia

Hi Karen,
This is most definitely not the Spider Wasp, Cryptocheilus bicolor. Not only is the coloration wrong, the species, like many wasps, is very host specific. This is one of the Sphecid Hunting Wasps. Our sources indicate that most Sphecid Wasps can sting painfully, but they are not aggressive. We have located online mention of a Grasshopper Hunting Wasp in Australia known as Podalonia tydei suspiciosa (Smith, 1856), but cannot locate a photo. We checked the Geocities site under Sphecid Wasps, and found images of Sphex cognatus, a Digger Wasp that preys upon Crickets and Grasshoppers. We are not certain that is your wasp, but it is possible. So, we are certain this is a Sphecid Wasp, but are inconclusive regarding species. Nonetheless, it is a very impressive photo. Eric Eaton wrote in the this addition: “The wasp stinging the grasshopper is indeed a sphecid, can’t tell what genus from that angle, but suspect Prionyx. Eric”

Hi Mr. Bugman,
Halls Head, Western Australia calling again…. Does this pic help Eric id our wasp? You mentioned it could possibly be Prionyx. This was taken from a slightly different angle minus his/her cricket. Thanks once again. Cheers
Karen

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