From the yearly archives: "2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some spiders and a ?
Hi,
We have lots of spiders in our garden – some quite large and easy to find, others not seen often. Tent Spider (top and bottom of same spider), and it’s web.

Tent Spider dorsal viewTent Spider ventral view

[What] seems to be a Grey House Spider, 2cm long and
(12cm legspan) Net Casting Spider?

Grey House SpiderNet Casting Spider

I used the Queensland Museum website to help identify some of them.
Thanks,
Robert

Thanks for sending in your images Robert, and also for doing all the research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spiders, Crane Flies
Folks,
You have a great site — thanks very much. I was preparing some nature pics of my own and used your resources to identify a few things. I’ve included some links below to a few of my pictures. A couple of questions: 1) In "crane_fly2.jpg", the bug has some red blobby things on its back. Any idea what that is? Eggs? 2) I believe that the spider skin is a skin from the spider in Fishing spider, I presume. I found a couple of these skins in the wood pile where the spider lives. It looks hollow to me and appears to have split apart when the spider was shedding it. Does this make sense or is it a dead spider?
Take care,
Andre Paquette
Ottawa Ontario Canada

Hi Andre,
The Crane Fly photo you inquired about is difficult to see, but the red blobs are probably mites which often infest Crane Flies. The skin is indeed a Dolomedes Fishing Spider exoskeleton. We really wanted to identify your beautiful black and white Crane Fly and we found Pedicia albivitta on the Crane Flies of Pennsylvania website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

centipede?
Hello Bugman –
I found this cute little guy in some leaf litter in oak/madrone forest in Oakland, CA. Any idea what she/he is? thanks,
Your Fan,
Allison

Hi Allison,
We have found similar Centipedes in our Mt. Washington garden. They are not very long, about two inches, and very thin. They are also very agile and delicate looking. Sadly, we have never properly identified them. Now that you have sent in a photo, we will try to do additional research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

i found this in my yard i have never seen one look like this. Its not a bad thing but i thought i was a really cool thing can you tell me what kind this is.. thanks for your time
robert fell INDIANA

Hi Robert,
This is a Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillar, Euchaetias egle. It is also known as a Harlequin Caterpillar and it feeds on milkweed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mantis news
Hello!
We just found your site and thoroughly enjoyed it. I am sending you some pictures of our mantises from this past year. Believe it or not, we have two that are still alive and kicking into 2006! One is about 2 inches long and the other is a giant mantis about 4 inches long. This year our smaller mantis laid 8 egg sacs and the larger one has laid 3 giant sacs. My daughter is a big mantis fan and has kept them for pets for the past few years. This is the longest we have had them survive. Most die in Nov or early December. Every year we learn new things. This year we had two males and one female and wanted to see what would happen with two… it was very interesting! As you can see in the picture, both got on her back and hung out there, waiting their turn, so to speak, and it actually looked as if they were communicating with each other while waiting… funny. It was hard to get a picture with the two of them but I did my best. Thanks for your site!
Christine and Elena

Hi Christine and Elena,
Thank you for your wonderful New Year’s message. Your photos are a fabulous addition to our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mantis news
Hello!
We just found your site and thoroughly enjoyed it. I am sending you some pictures of our mantises from this past year. Believe it or not, we have two that are still alive and kicking into 2006! One is about 2 inches long and the other is a giant mantis about 4 inches long. This year our smaller mantis laid 8 egg sacs and the larger one has laid 3 giant sacs. My daughter is a big mantis fan and has kept them for pets for the past few years. This is the longest we have had them survive. Most die in Nov or early December. Every year we learn new things. This year we had two males and one female and wanted to see what would happen with two… it was very interesting! As you can see in the picture, both got on her back and hung out there, waiting their turn, so to speak, and it actually looked as if they were communicating with each other while waiting… funny. It was hard to get a picture with the two of them but I did my best. Thanks for your site!
Christine and Elena

Hi Christine and Elena,
Thank you for your wonderful New Year’s message. Your photos are a fabulous addition to our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination