From the yearly archives: "2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this bug?
Merry Xmas!
Just wondered if you could identify this beetle seen a month ago in the Royal National Park just south of Sydney. Is it a Jewel Beetle? Many thanks for any help you can offer. Best regards
Jon Cornish

Hi Jon,
This in not a Beetle. It is a Hemipteran in the family Pentatomidae, the Stink Bugs. It is an immature specimen which makes species identification more difficult. Many Stink Bugs have bright metallic coloration and we found a page that identifies a similar looking specimen as being in the family Scutelleridae which are called Jewel Bugs in Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please tell me what It is.
Hi Bugman,
I hope you could tell me what this is too. I found this in Los Angeles, California near DownTown Los Angeles on December 14, 2006. It didn’t move even if I threw a quarter or a penny. It’s more than 2"x1"x1". I believe it doesn’t have any wings and the shape might look like a bee w/o wings, or a giant ant. Hope to hear from you soon. Best Regards,
Tak S.

Hi Tak,
This is probably our most common insect query subject from southern California. This is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket. They are subterranean dwellers that are often discovered in gardens, especially in the winter and spring during rainy season.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please tell me what It is.
Hi Bugman,
I hope you could tell me what this is too. I found this in Los Angeles, California near DownTown Los Angeles on December 14, 2006. It didn’t move even if I threw a quarter or a penny. It’s more than 2"x1"x1". I believe it doesn’t have any wings and the shape might look like a bee w/o wings, or a giant ant. Hope to hear from you soon. Best Regards,
Tak S.

Hi Tak,
This is probably our most common insect query subject from southern California. This is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket. They are subterranean dwellers that are often discovered in gardens, especially in the winter and spring during rainy season. Potato Bugs are in the family Stenopelmatidae, and in the genus Stenopelmatus. They eat roots and tubers. Because of their unusual appearance, there are many myths and superstitions about these fascinating creatures.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats that bug?
Hi Bugman,
I found this beetle sitting on a box beside me as I was watching TV. I think it probably came from my Christmas tree. It freaked me out at first but I refrained from squishing him because the orange markings were so interesting. 😉 I did decide to take him with me to the computer as I was trying to find out what type of beetle it was. After searching the internet for a while I could not identify the beetle, so I decided to make a bug home for him so I could show my kids. In the process of making the home he just took off and who knows if he will return or if I will every see him again? Thanks for any help!
Dan

Hi Dan,
This is not a beetle, but a Stink Bug in the genus Perillus, most likely the Two Spotted Stink Bug, Perillus bioculatus. Many Stink Bugs, as well as other Hemipterans or True Bugs, seek shelter indoors as the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

fishfly?
Dear Bugman,
I found this sizeable insect last April while on vacation in Emerald Isle, North Carolina. I was searching female dobsonfly sites, but the wing veination wasn’t quite right. Then I came to your site, and it seems to more closely resemble fishflies. Your thoughts? Thank you.
Dave Spier

Hi Dave,
Dobsonflies and Fishflies are both in the Family Corydalidae. Fishflies have antennae with soft comblike projections on one side. Dobsonflies do not. We believe this to be a female Dobsonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

sawfly larvae
Dear Bugman,
I thought you might like to see this interesting photo of sawfly larvae (Long Tailed Sawfly?) eating a Spotted Gum leaf from both sides! They were in our backyard on the East Coast of NSW Australia. (Spotted Gum used to be a Eucalypt, but it has been reclassified as Corymbia maculata, which doesn’t sound nearly as interesting).
Grev

Hi again Grev,
Thanks for sending us your humorous Sawfly Larvae image. This social feeding pattern is seen in other Sawflies as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination