From the monthly archives: "November 2006"

Unknown Butterfly from Big Bend National Park in Texas
We spotted this butterfly on November 12th. It was resting among some leaf litter near a spring at the base of the Chisos Mountains (approx 4000 ft) in Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The wingspan was about 3.5 inches. Any idea what species belongs to? Thanks,
Daryl & Janet Eby

Hi Daryl and Janet,
Even though it ranges as far east as Texas, this beauty is commonly called the California Sister, Adelpha bredowii. They are rapid flying butterflies often associated with oak forests.

Caterpillars on Cassia
I found these two on my cassia last week. I think the one with stripes running the length is a sulphur of some kind. Any idea about the other one?
Donna Williams
DeLand, Florida

Hi Donna,
We are pretty certain both of your caterpillars are the same species, the Cloudless Sulphur, Phoebis sennae, a beautiful, swift flying, shrome yellow butterfly. BugGuide pictures two color forms of the caterpillar, green with longitudinal stripes, and yellow with traverse stripes. The yellow form is reportedly more common when the caterpillar feeds on flowers, but both of your specimens seems to be feeding on the flowers.

Sulphurs (11/16/2006)
Hey Guys, The pic on the right could also be Orange barred sulphur (Phoebis philea). I’ve seen then both feeding on species of Cassia and Senna in Southern Florida. Sometimes they feed on the same plant. We have them both here on the Gulf Coast of Texas, as well. I took a few of each and raised them, and when they’re in the Yellow/flower eating from they look alot alike. Just wanted to share. Eric Duran
Nature Discovery Center
Bellaire, TX

A bug with white cross on maroon colored back, with black and white strips on the bottom.
Hi,
I found this bug which I have never seen before in my house. I wonder if it has anything to do with my son’s fever. He is only 4yrs old and running a fever of 102.92 Fahrenheit. Could you please identify for me if it is dangerous or poisonous? Thanks!
Brgds
Christine

Hi Christine,
The Cotton Stainer is not responsible for your son’s fever.

need help, what is this weird bug
Dear Bugman,
See attached picture of this bug we found in my garage. It is at least 2 inches long. We live in Santa Monica California. Any idea? Is it dangerous? What should I do with it? Thank you very much for the information. Regards,
Neil Morley and Rachel Bennahum

Hi Neil and Rachel,
The Potato Bug has several other common names including Jerusalem Cricket, Sand Puppy, and in Spanish, Ni

Please help us identify
Attached are three pictures of an insect me and a buddy saw while on a mountain biking trip in Northeast Georgia (Helen). We have no clue and have never seen something like this before. Can you please help us identify. Very much appreciate.
Jonathan McLandrich

Hi Jonathan,
This is a female Dobsonfly. The larvae are prized bait for fishermen and are called Hellgramites. The adults are short lived and do not feed. We get most of our identification requests from May through July, so your specimen is either very early or very late.

Thank you. The pictures are from late July so it fits within your given time frame. Thanks again.
Jonathan McLandrich

HI FROM PARADISE !!
HELLO THERE— MY NAME IS JUAN CARLOS, I LIVE IN PUERTO VALLARTA JAL, MEXICO I JUST LOVE YOUR PAGE (AND OFF COURSE INSECTS) I AM SENDING YOU SOME PICTURES OFF A TAILLESS WHIPSCORPION THAT IS MY HAND THANKS (AS YOU CAN SEE MY LANGUAGE IS SPANISH)
Juan Carlos Lemus

Hi Juan Carlos,
We got another letter once that reported the Spanish name for a Tailless Whipscorpion is a Cancle. Thanks for the verification. Your photo is great and will surely creep out some of our readers. We can’t imagine that your tourist bureau advertises with photos of the Tailless Whipscorpion, but we are sure eager to visit your paradise.