From the monthly archives: "October 2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s That Bug?
Hi,
Just out of curiosity — enclosed is a bug/fly/bee picture I took just a few minutes ago. Can you make out what it is? At first, I thought it was the Virescent Green Metallic Bee, but the green on this fella is not metallic – it’s just bright green. And, it doesn’t have big hairy legs. Also, it doesn’t have the 3-part segmented body like a bee would have. It’s about 1.5 inches long (from tip of the head to the tail) and maybe slightly less than half an inch wide (you can make a rough comparison with the blue standard-sized Kong doggie rubber bone). I tried Googling for more information about this insect — unfortunately, I can’t find anything that’s remotely close to this big fella. And instead, I found your website. 🙂 Oh, just in case this might help, I’m from Melbourne, Australia. Thanks!
Cheers!
Lynn
Minutes later: Oops! I found out what this is already — it’s a cicada! Sorry to trouble you!

Hi Lynn,
We are very happy you figured out this beauty is a Cicada. The photo isn’t detailed enough to be certain, but it might be a Green Grocer, Cyclochila virens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

a picture for you
Please identify this spider for me or tell me if the image didn’t come through. The spider is a vivid orange with black markings.
Carol

Hi Carol,
This is a beautiful Marbled Orb Weaver, Araneus marmoreus. The spider hides in a retreat from its web and drops to the ground when approached and disturbed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Check out these Pandora Sphinx photos
Hi there, My seven year old son spotted this beautiful Pandora Sphinx so we proceeded to take some shots. I think they came out quite well.
DANIEL LEVY

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for sending in your lovely photo of a Pandora Sphinx. Our readers alwayls like knowing locations, and even if you provide a location in a subsequent email, we may not be able to post it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Emailing: Moth 011, Moth 012, Moth 014
Hi,
I have a catyliad orchid in bloom and noticed this beautiful moth hanging out nearby. I searched the internet to find out what it was and found your site. Are thses moths attracted to orchids? I live in Orlando, FL and this guy was here this past Saturday. He was gone the next day. I don’t know if it’s a vine sphinx or banded sphinx but I was fascinated at the 3D affect of the markings. It looked like inlaid wood! Are these rare or common? Thanks for the great site!
Debe Cummings

Hi Debe,
Both the Banded Sphinx and Vine Sphinx are found in Florida and they resemble one another. We believe your specimen is a Banded Sphinx, the more common species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Toe Biter On Beach!
Hello
Whilst holidaying in the Dominican Republic we came across this fella on the beach. When we got home we searched the Internet and found out from your (very good) site that it’s a Giant Water Bug. He/she was incredibly aggressive; when we went near it, it raised those pincers at us so we kept our distance but still managed to get this photo and a few others. Looking at your site it appears they live in freshwater; could this one have lived in the sea? There was no freshwater nearby. Even the locals looked intrigued at it!
Thanks very much
Neil Williams (Birmingham, England)

Hi Neil,
There are different species of Giant Water Bugs in many parts of the world. We are not sure if any will swim in salt water. As they can fly great distances, it is possible it flew from a pond several miles away.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Picture of a velvet mite
We take pics of a lot of insects, reptiles, mammals, etc. For your archives, we send these pics of velvet mites taken at the Empire Ranch in Arizona. These insects only come out for 24-48 hours one time a year during the rainy season. Very curious little creatures.

The appearance of Velvet Mites or Angelitos coincides with the rain. Since the larvae prey on grasshopper eggs, the mites are probably more plentiful in the years following a grasshopper population explosion.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination